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int a =10;
a = 30;

&

String a = "abc";
a = "xyz";

Can anybody tell me what kind of assignment is performed here.

I know it's hardly worth to ask such a silly question but i just want to find the difference between String-assignment & other objects-assignment.

As i know every String value like "abc" is a String object itself then what kind or operation performed when it is assigned to a String Object. like a = "xyz".

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what are you trying to ask ? the first line is to declare the datatype of variable as well as assign the value, we just need to declare datatype once, then can assign value to same variable multiple times –  Deepanshu Apr 10 '13 at 5:20

9 Answers 9

String is immutable, when you write

String a ="abc" 

a string with content abc is created in string pool, and when you write a = "xyz" another string is created in string pool with content xyz, the older string is not replaced. whereas in case of int, the value is changed.

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int a = 10;
a = 30;

now a have new value i.e. 30

String a = "abc";
a = "xyz";

Reference variable a now point to new String object ie xyz

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Strings are immutable meaning they cannot be changed (in memory).

So when I create a String

String a = "abc";

and then I assign it

a = "xyz"

What happened is a was point at the memory for "abc", but now is a completely new string and points at "xyz"

Now for the int on the other hand they just change, they are mutable. So when I create an int

int a = 10;

and then assign it

a = 30;

What happened is a was pointing at the memory for 10, but now 10 has changed to 30 but a is still pointing to the same memory.

Note: this is the reason why you can say if (String1 == String2). That will test if they are pointing at the same memory location. So you must do if (String1.equals(String2)) to test if they are the same words.

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String is immutable.Hence new object is created when you reassign reference.So new object XYZ will be created in heap.

String a = "abc";
a = "xyz";

Primitives defined locally would be on the stack. However if a primitive were defined as part of an instance of an object, that primitive would be on the heap.

int a =10;
a = 30;

So in above case, a will be on stack.

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  1. int is a primitive type - not an object

  2. In your String example Java would create "abc" String object, assign a reference to this object to variable a, then create "xyz" String object and assign a reference to this object to variable 'a' (overwriting its previous value).

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int a=10

Assign an integer value 10 to a new reference variable 'a' of type int.

a=30

Assign an integer value 30 to the same reference variable 'a'.

String a="abc"

Create a new String object "abc" and assign it to a new reference variable 'a' of type String.

a="xyz"

Create a new String object "xyz" and make the variable 'a' points to it. Now there are two String objects in the Heap memory, "abc" and "xyz" . The reference to String "abc" is now lost unless you make another variable to point to it.

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The String is an immutable object. When you reassign a value to a String, the system recreates the String object. Your example actually works like this:

  String a = "abs";
  a = new String("xy");

Second, an int is not an object, it is a primitive variable; it doesn't have any methods. For similar operations, you need an Integer object.

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A String is immutable. You cannot change the value of a String; you instantiate a new String every time. int is different; you don't create new instances of primitives, and if it's sufficiently small (i.e. between -1 and 5, inclusive), it will push a constant value onto the stack.

Well, let's take a look at it on a deeper level.

Here's a sample class which illustrates assignment to an int and a String.

public class StackOverflow {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int anInt = 30;
        anInt = 5;

        String aWord = "This is not a word";
        aWord = "And we did it again...!";
    }
}

Here's what the bytecode is doing (the man behind the curtain). I'm using the above link as reference into what the bytecode actually means.

// class version 51.0 (51)
// access flags 0x21
public class StackOverflow {

    // compiled from: StackOverflow.java

    // access flags 0x1
    public <init>()V
        L0
    LINENUMBER 1 L0
    ALOAD 0
    INVOKESPECIAL java/lang/Object.<init> ()V
        RETURN
    L1
    LOCALVARIABLE this LStackOverflow; L0 L1 0
    MAXSTACK = 1
    MAXLOCALS = 1

    // access flags 0x9
    public static main([Ljava/lang/String;)V
    L0
    LINENUMBER 3 L0
    BIPUSH 30
    ISTORE 1
    L1
    LINENUMBER 4 L1
        ICONST_5
    ISTORE 1
    L2
    LINENUMBER 6 L2
    LDC "This is not a word"
    ASTORE 2
    L3
    LINENUMBER 7 L3
    LDC "And we did it again...!"
    ASTORE 2
    L4
    LINENUMBER 8 L4
        RETURN
    L5
    LOCALVARIABLE args [Ljava/lang/String; L0 L5 0
    LOCALVARIABLE anInt I L1 L5 1
    LOCALVARIABLE aWord Ljava/lang/String; L3 L5 2
    MAXSTACK = 1
    MAXLOCALS = 3
}

So, the relevant portions of our little class are:

  • push the byte 30 onto the stack (it's small enough to be considered a byte)
  • store that into variable 1
  • push the constant 5 onto the stack
  • store that into variable 1, overwriting our 30
  • load from a constant pool the first string "This is not a word"
  • store the reference into variable 2
  • load from a constant pool the second string "And we did it again...!"
  • store the reference into variable 2

The big differences is that we're storing references every time we store the String. We're not bothering with that with an int, due to it being a primitive.

And that is your difference.

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There are two different JVM instructions used for this operations:

  1. astore saves a reference to an object
  2. istore saves int value

What actually do you want to find out from this?

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