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So I'm trying to understand the example at http://bl.ocks.org/mbostock/4062045 and have a few questions.

From the example:

  var link = svg.selectAll(".link")
      .data(graph.links)
    .enter().append("line")
      .attr("class", "link")
      .style("stroke-width", function(d) { return Math.sqrt(d.value); });

What that's basically doing (as I understand it) is getting all elements of the "link" class (ie. nothing) and then adding everything from "graphs.links" to that empty list of elements. All the new elements (as denoted by "enter()" are being encapsulated by a "line" tag, having a "class" attribute set and being stylized.

My question is... if you know selectAll() isn't going to get anything why do it at all? Why not do this?:

  var link = svg
      .data(graph.links)
    .enter().append("line")
      .attr("class", "link")
      .style("stroke-width", function(d) { return Math.sqrt(d.value); });

I guess one reason not to do it is that it doesn't seem to work lol but why not?

Of course it also seems that enter() would be redundant too if you assume everything is new.

Any ideas?

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2 Answers 2

If you appy this with empty graph.links and then do console.log(links), here is what you will get on the chrome javascript console:

[Array[0], select: function, selectAll: function, attr: function, classed: function, style: function…]

So, yes, you will have an empty array, but you have all the functions already there so that, when you add data afterwards, you don't have to do everything again. That's how d3 is smart.

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To understand what is done exactly, let's walk the example from top to bottom:

var link = svg.selectAll(".link")
  .data(graph.links)
.enter().append("line")
  .attr("class", "link")
  .style("stroke-width", function(d) { return Math.sqrt(d.value); });

selectAll is performed to catch any preexisting links (which are none like you correctly assume), and to return a selection (which is empty). Then data is assigned to the empty selection via data. enter then returns a selection of nodes based on the differences between nodes presumed in data and the selection returned by selectAll, which in this example is all the nodes because there are no preexisting ones. These nodes are then appended to the svg element via using append.

Now, the reason why selectAll has to be used is fairly simple: The svg element is created using append here:

var svg = d3.select("body").append("svg")
.attr("width", width)
.attr("height", height);

append in this case (because it comes after select) returns an d3 selection array with one element via select. This assumes that the returned node is one element only. Because the Sizzle engine returns all selections in array-like objects, it behaves like an array, but d3 assumes it is an array with only one node element in it. This is why when you relieve the selectAll and the enterstatement, one single node is drawn by data and append. If you try to change this by reappending enter to the statement, you're out of luck: enter tries to make its selection containing all the nodes defined by data not existing in the preexisting selection. Because it assumes the preexisting selection is an array of nodes, it fails to do its job with a single node returned by select.

selectAll, on the other hand, returns the needed array of nodes. Because there are no preexisting nodes, you could also relieve the string selector, but it is surely better to have it there because it shows the intention of updating all the links and nodes accordingly. And it would be prone to bugs if you add preexisting nodes later.

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