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 class Car():  
    def __init__(self,input):  
        self.carName = input  
    def showName(self):  
        print self.carName  
 a = Car("bmw")  
 print type(a)  
 print a  

This returns me

<type 'instance'>
<__main__.Car instance at 0x7f188f38de60>

Whereas

 class Car(unicode):  
    def __init__(self,input):  
        self.carName = input  
    def showName(self):  
        print self.carName  
 a = Car("bmw")  
 print type(a)  
 print a  

<class '__main__.Car'>
bmw

As far as I understand, print triggers the object.str() method but what is the significance of unicode here ?

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1 Answer 1

The significance is that you've created a class that subclasses the built-in class unicode. It's hard to see why you would want to do that for a class named Car.

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i was trying to experiment, is the __str__ method, defined for the Unicode class ? i'm sorry, but i'm unable to locate the correct documentation for it. –  sharky Apr 10 '13 at 5:37
    
@sharky: Of course unicode has __str__ (and many other methods). Try dir(u''). –  NPE Apr 10 '13 at 5:39
    
thanks, by doing this I also came across the __dict__ method, +1 –  sharky Apr 10 '13 at 5:50

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