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I have a hexagon grid:

hexagon grid

with template type coordinates T. How I can calculate distance between two hexagons?

For example:

dist((3,3), (5,5)) = 3

dist((1,2), (1,4)) = 2

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how big is your grid? –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 10 '13 at 7:44
    
Why don't you use the distance formula? –  OGH Apr 10 '13 at 7:45
4  
@OGH there is no such formula for step distance in hexagonal grid or at least it is not as well known as you make it sound. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Apr 10 '13 at 7:47
    
Grid's size is m rows and n cols. –  zodiac Apr 10 '13 at 7:48
1  

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First apply the transform (y, x) |-> (u, v) = (x, y + floor(x / 2)).

Now the facial adjacency looks like

 0 1 2 3
0*-*-*-*
 |\|\|\|
1*-*-*-*
 |\|\|\|
2*-*-*-*

Let the points be (u1, v1) and (u2, v2). Let du = u2 - u1 and dv = v2 - v1. The distance is

if du and dv have the same sign: max(|du|, |dv|), by using the diagonals
if du and dv have different signs: |du| + |dv|, because the diagonals are unproductive

In Python:

def dist(p1, p2):
    y1, x1 = p1
    y2, x2 = p2
    du = x2 - x1
    dv = (y2 + x2 // 2) - (y1 + x1 // 2)
    return max(abs(du), abs(dv)) if ((du >= 0 and dv >= 0) or (du < 0 and dv < 0)) else abs(du) + abs(dv)
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Your variant is correct. Thanks. –  zodiac Apr 10 '13 at 19:15
    
+1 good explanations (the language was c++ though) –  didierc Apr 11 '13 at 17:18

The correct explicit formula for the distance, with your coordinate system, is given by:

d((x1,y1),(x2,y2)) = max( abs(x1 - x2), 
                          abs((y1 + floor(x1/2)) - (y2 + floor(x2/2)))
                        )
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Your abs(x1,x2) seems to be wrong. Did you mean max? –  Serdalis Apr 10 '13 at 8:56
    
@Serdalis A Typo, I mean "-" instead of "," –  flolo Apr 10 '13 at 8:57
    
It seems to be returning 1 less than the actual answer. (examples from armin in the comments on my answer). –  Serdalis Apr 10 '13 at 8:58
    
@Serdalis: I tried it: dist((0,0),(5,4)) = max(5, abs((0 + 0/2) - (5 + 4/2)) = max(5,7) = 7; dist((3,3), (5,4)) = max (2, abs((3+3/2) - (5 + 4/2)) = max(2, 3) = 3. Seems right –  flolo Apr 10 '13 at 9:02
1  
@Serdalis, d((0,2), (5,1)) = 4 != 5. That's if d = max(abs(y1 - y2), abs((x1 + floor(y1 / 2))) - (x2 + floor(y2 / 2))). When I use d = max(abs(x1 - x2), ...), then d((1,0), (0,2)) = 1 != 2. –  zodiac Apr 10 '13 at 9:36

First, you need to transform your coordinates to a "mathematical" coordinate system. Every two columns you shift your coordinates by 1 unit in the y-direction. The "mathamatical" coordinates (s, t) can be calculated from your coordinates (u,v) as follows:

s = u + floor(v/2) t = v

If you call one side of your hexagons a, the basis vectors of your coordinate system are (0, -sqrt(3)a) and (3a/2, sqrt(3)a/2). To find the minimum distance between your points, you need to calculate the manhattan distance in your coordinate system, which is given by |s1-s2|+|t1-t2| where s and t are the coordinates in your system. The manhattan distance only covers walking in the direction of your basis vectors so it only covers walking like that: |/ but not walking like that: |\. You need to transform your vectors into another coordinate system with basis vectors (0, -sqrt(3)a) and (3a/2, -sqrt(3)a/2). The coordinates in this system are given by s'=s-t and t'=t so the manhattan distance in this coordinate system is given by |s1'-s2'|+|t1'-t2'|. The distance you are looking for is the minimum of the two calculated manhattan distances. Your code would look like this:

struct point
{
  int u;
  int v;
}

int dist(point const & p, point const & q)
{
  int const ps = p.u + (p.v / 2); // integer division!
  int const pt = p.v;
  int const qs = q.u + (q.v / 2);
  int const qt = q.v;
  int const dist1 = abs(ps - qs) + abs(pt - qt);
  int const dist2 = abs((ps - pt) - (qs - qt)) + abs(pt - qt);
  return std::min(dist1, dist2);
}
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The same mistake. dist((2,1), (1,2)): dist1 = abs(2 - 1) + abs(1 - 2) = 2, dist2 = abs((2 - 1) - (1 - 2)) + abs(1 - 2) = abs(2) + abs(-1) = 3 and result is 2 != 1 –  zodiac Apr 10 '13 at 12:40
    
Ah, now I see that you are not using a coordinate system in the mathematical sense. You need to transform your coordinates to a mathematical coordinate system first. I will try to update my answer. –  MadScientist Apr 10 '13 at 13:00

Here is what a did:

Taking one cell as center (it is easy to see if you choose 0,0), cells at distance dY form a big hexagon (with “radius” dY). One vertices of this hexagon is (dY2,dY). If dX<=dY2 the path is a zig-zag to the ram of the big hexagon with a distance dY. If not, then the path is the “diagonal” to the vertices, plus an vertical path from the vertices to the second cell, with add dX-dY2 cells.

Maybe better to understand: led:

dX = abs(x1 - x2);
dY = abs(y1 - y2);
dY2= floor((abs(y1 - y2) +  (y1+1)%2  ) / 2);

Then:

 d = d((x1,y1),(x2,y2)) 
   = dX < dY2 ? dY : dY + dX-dY2 + y1%2 * dY%2
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That isn't correct too. d((2,1), (1,2)) = 2 != 1. –  zodiac Apr 10 '13 at 12:30
    
@zodiac. Using my formula d=1, and from the fig. d=1 too. From where d=2 ? Ah, ok you readed before my last edit. Sorry. It was an error in the simplified formula, but it was correct in the "original" one. –  qPCR4vir Apr 10 '13 at 12:42
    
d((2,1), (3,1)): dx = 1, dy = 0, dy2 = 0 and result is d = 0 != 1 –  zodiac Apr 10 '13 at 12:52
    
@zodiac: You are rigth! The simplified formula make me a lot of problem. But the "original" is still rigth ! –  qPCR4vir Apr 10 '13 at 13:10
    
d((3,2), (0,1)) = 3 != 4 –  zodiac Apr 10 '13 at 13:30

Posting here after I saw a blog post of mine had gotten referral traffic from another answer here. It got voted down, rightly so, because it was incorrect; but it was a mischaracterization of the solution put forth in my post.

Your 'squiggly' axis - in terms of your x coordinate being displaced every other row - is going to cause you all sorts of headaches with trying to determine distances or doing pathfinding later on, if this is for a game of some sort. Hexagon grids lend themselves to three axes naturally, and a 'squared off' grid of hexagons will optimally have some negative coordinates, which allows for simpler math around distances.

Here's a grid with (x,y) mapped out, with x increasing to the lower right, and y increasing upwards.

Hexagon grid with two coordinates and three axes overlaid

By straightening things out, the third axis becomes obvious.

Hexagon grid with three coordinates and three axes overlaid

The neat thing about this, is that the three coordinates become interlinked - the sum of all three coordinates will always be 0.

With such a consistent coordinate system, the atomic distance between any two hexes is the largest change between the three coordinates, or:

d = max( abs(x1 - x2), abs(y1 -y2), abs( (-x1 + -y1) - (-x2 + -y2) )

Pretty straightforward. But you must fix your grid first!

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I believe the answer you seek is:

d((x1,y1),(x2,y2))=max(abs(x1-x2),abs(y1-y2));

You can find a good explanation on hexagonal grid coordinate-system/distances here:

http://keekerdc.com/2011/03/hexagon-grids-coordinate-systems-and-distance-calculations/

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1  
No. It doesn't work for dist((2,0), (5,2)) = 4 != max(3, 2) = 3 –  zodiac Apr 10 '13 at 7:58
1  
this method fails to determine the distance of one of the examples given, dist((3,3), (5,5)) = 3 –  tafa Apr 10 '13 at 7:59
1  
This fails, because they use a different coordinate system. –  flolo Apr 10 '13 at 8:34

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