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I'm currently reading through the Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide and found the following:

   # Generate binary choice, that is, "true" or "false" value.
   BINARY=2
   T=1
   number=$RANDOM

   let "number %= $BINARY"
   #  Note that    let "number >>= 14"    gives a better random distribution
   #+ (right shifts out everything except last binary digit).
   if [ "$number" -eq $T ]
   then
       echo "TRUE"
   else
       echo "FALSE"
   fi  

   echo

Why is it recommended to take bit 15 instead of bit 1? A couple of runs with binary decisions revealed no significant difference between the two.

// UPDATE Since i was asked how i calculated the distribution, here we go. I generated a couple of $RANDOM numbers, took bit 15 and bit 1 of each number and created two binary sequences. Afterwards i looped through those sequences, checked for chains of 1 and 0 (runs), calculated how many of those runs a maximum length sequence would generate (for reference) and printed everything into a confusing table. Here's the code in all it's glory (sorry for the dirty code...):

#! /bin/bash
COUNT=10000
RUN=1

# generate 2 sequences based on the same $RANDOM numbers
# seq1 = modulo 2, seq2 = bitshift 14
while [ $RUN -le $COUNT ]
do
    number=$RANDOM 
    let 'var1=number%2'
    var2=$number 
    let 'var2 >>= 14'
    seq1="${seq1}${var1}"
    seq2="${seq2}${var2}"
    (( RUN+=1 ))
done

# loop through sequences and check for chains of 1 and 0 (runs)
length=${#seq1}
prevSym=${seq1:0:1}
currRun="${prevSym}"
for (( i=1; i<length; i++ )); do
    currSym=${seq1:$i:1}
    if (( currSym==prevSym )); then
        currRun="${currRun}${currSym}"
        (( i!=length-1 )) && continue
        (( runStat1[${#currRun}]++ ))               #case: ends with run length > 1
        break
    fi
    (( runStat1[${#currRun}]++ ))
    (( prevSym=currSym ))
    (( i==length-1 )) && (( runStat1[1]++ ))             #case: ends with run length = 1
    currRun="${currSym}"
done

length=${#seq2}
prevSym=${seq2:0:1}
currRun="${prevSym}"
for (( i=1; i<length; i++ )); do
    currSym=${seq2:$i:1}
    if (( currSym==prevSym )); then
        currRun="${currRun}${currSym}"
        (( i!=length-1 )) && continue
        (( runStat2[${#currRun}]++ ))               #case: ends with run length > 1
        break
    fi
    (( runStat2[${#currRun}]++ ))
    (( prevSym=currSym ))
    (( i==length-1 )) && (( runStat2[1]++ ))             #case: ends with run length = 1
    currRun="${currSym}"
done

# print results and expected frequency
# number of expected runs with runlength k:
# 1/2**k if k<n, 1/2**(k-1) if k=n  
# $RANDOM generates random numbers in the range 0 to 32768 thus n=15
n=15
echo -e "Length L of run | # of runs with %2 | # of runs with >>14 | # of runs with MLS (calculated)\n "
echo -e "L\t|%2\t|>>14\t|MLS"
echo -e "-----------------------------------\n"
sorted="${!runStat1[*]} ${!runStat2[*]}" 
sorted=$(echo $sorted | tr ' ' '\n' | sort -n | uniq)
for a in $sorted; do
    k=${a}
    (( ${a}==${n} )) && (( k=a-1 ))
    prob=$(awk -v k=${a} -v c=${COUNT} 'BEGIN { print (((1/2)**k)*c)/k}')
    echo -e "${a} \t| ${runStat1[$a]} \t| ${runStat2[$a]} \t| ${prob} "
done

Running it will print out something along those lines:

Length L of run | # of runs with %2 | # of runs with >>14 | # of runs with MLS (calculated)
L   |%2 |>>14   |MLS
-----------------------------------

1   | 2495  | 2450  | 5000 
2   | 1219  | 1212  | 1250 
3   | 638   | 621   | 416.667 
4   | 300   | 329   | 156.25 
5   | 162   | 166   | 62.5 
6   | 75    | 81    | 26.0417 
7   | 46    | 34    | 11.1607 
8   | 23    | 26    | 4.88281 
9   | 13    | 7     | 2.17014 
10  | 2     | 6     | 0.976562 
11  | 1     | 1     | 0.443892 
13  | 3     |   | 0.0939002 
15  |   | 2     | 0.0203451 
21  |   | 1     | 0.000227065 

Which leads me to the conclusion that, unsurprisingly and also mentioned in all bash references, $RANDOM is a terrible source for randomness... But also "number >>= 14" doesn't have a better random distribution than "number %=2" for a binary choice.

... or i made huge mistake somewhere in this huge mess of silly calculations. You tell me.

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3  
How is this question off topic? An explanation was requested for # Note that let "number >>= 14" gives a better random distribution –  dozedoff Apr 10 '13 at 9:35
    
How did you calculate/plot the random distribution? –  Adrian Frühwirth Apr 10 '13 at 13:53
    
Updated the original post with my calculation –  araex Apr 10 '13 at 21:35
    
Thanks for sharing your code! On first glance this looks good to me, but: let's assume the sequences 101010101010 and 111000111000. The first sequence gives 12 runs of length 1, the second sequence gives 4 runs of length 3 but I would say that both sequences are equally non-random. Shouldn't all subpatterns which are themselves repeated patterns be taken into account to discuss the random distribution of the alphabet in the generated sequence, and not just runs of each individual symbol? –  Adrian Frühwirth Apr 11 '13 at 17:47
    
That is correct, both of your examples are not random at all and this is taken into consideration with my calculations. A (pseudo)random sequence would require runs with different length which is represented by my calculation / output. A good random sequence would ouput something similar to the MLS colomn. This is based on the properties of maximum length sequences. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  araex Apr 11 '13 at 21:26
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The recommendation to use the high-order bits is because many random number generators are implemented as linear congruential generators, which generate poor randomness in the low-order bits.

For example, the following RNG implementation used to be very common. (I believe it was given as an example in the C89 standard.)

unsigned old_rand() {
  next = next * 1103515245 + 12345;
  return next;
}

Now check out what kind of numbers this generates.

2140733074   // even
3902869603   // odd
4012135520   // even
2255314201   // odd
3913576926   // even
2626310079   // odd
4159329932   // even
1903014357   // odd

Bit 1 is not random at all.

Even a higher-quality LCG, like the one used in Java, suffers from this effect, as this nice graphical demonstration shows. So don't trust the low-order bits of unknown RNGs.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! Even tho this does not seem to be the case with bash $RANDOM (they might be doing something similar to javas RNG to hide this effect? Didn't check the source), i do see why it's recommended. Learned something for my future use of RNGs in general! –  araex May 7 '13 at 7:29
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