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I have a large ASCII file (~100GB) which consists of roughly 1.000.000 lines of known formatted numbers which I try to process with python. The file is too large to read in completely into memory, so I decided to process the file line by line:

fp = open(file_name)
for count,line in enumerate(fp):
    data = np.array(line.split(),dtype=np.float)
    #do stuff
fp.close()

It turns out, that I spend most of the run time of my program in the data = line. Are there any ways to speed up that line? Also, the execution speed seem much slower than what I could get from an native FORTRAN program with formated read (see this question, I've implemented a FORTRAN string processor and used it with f2py, but the run time was only comparable with the data = line. I guess the I/O handling and type conversions between Python/FORTRAN killed what I gained from FORTRAN)

Since I know the formatting, shouldn't there be a better and faster way as to use split()? Something like:

data = readf(line,'(1000F20.10)')

I tried the fortranformat package, which worked well, but in my case was three times slower than thee split() approach.

P.S. As suggested by ExP and root I tried the np.fromstring and made this quick and dirtry benchmark:

t1 = time.time()
for i in range(500):
  data=np.array(line.split(),dtype=np.float)
t2 = time.time()    
print (t2-t1)/500
print data.shape
print data[0]
0.00160977363586
(9002,)
0.0015162509

and:

t1 = time.time()
for i in range(500):    
   data = np.fromstring(line,sep=' ',dtype=np.float,count=9002)
t2 = time.time()
print (t2-t1)/500
print data.shape
print data[0]
0.00159792804718
(9002,)
0.0015162509

so fromstring is in fact slightly slower in my case.

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You should check out the timeit module for testing these little snippets. –  DSM Apr 10 '13 at 10:08
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2 Answers 2

The np.genfromtxt function is a speed champion if you can get it to match you input format.

If not, then you may already be using the fastest method. Your line-by-line split-into-array approach exactly matches the SciPy Cookbook examples.

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From my understanding np.genfromtext will try to read the whole file into memory which is not possible in this case (file is ~100GB). –  Andre Apr 10 '13 at 8:29
    
It would be sad if this is the fastest method. I don't like to spend/waste so much time and CPU cycles on something that in my opinion should be fast and straight forward (i.e. using the known format code) - but maybe I'm too much influenced by FORTRAN. –  Andre Apr 10 '13 at 8:41
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Have you tried numpyp.fromstring?

np.fromstring(line, dtype=np.float, sep=" ")
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Yes, the speed is about the same as the split() approach. I guess to really speed things up format codes must be "natively" used. –  Andre Apr 10 '13 at 8:35
    
@Andre - for me it is about 3x faster than your split approach... –  root Apr 10 '13 at 8:38
    
@root ok I will try this again, maybe I missed something –  Andre Apr 10 '13 at 8:45
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