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I am creating an Excel macro that removes all the empty rows in an excel sheet. My issue is that this macro takes to long to finish. The files are generated automatically and every file needs to run this macro. The macro deletes one row at a time after checking its value.

I am a beginner in VB. Bu i need something like this:

If  rowValue = "" then
    deleteThisRow And deleteAll Subsequent rows at once
End If

is that possible??

this is the code i am using now:

Sub RemoveRows()
    Range("A8").Select 
    Dim checkval 
    Dim RowAmount
    RowAmount = 93

    Do
        checkval = ActiveCell.Value
        If (checkval = "") Then
            ActiveCell.EntireRow.Delete
        Else
            ActiveCell.Offset(1, 0).Select
        End If
        RowAmount = RowAmount - 1
    Loop While RowAmount > 0
End Sub

thanks for the help.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Your idea to delete all necassary rows in one operation is bang on. In addition avoiding Select and avoiding looping over a range of cells will speed thing up too.

Here's an approach that should work for you

Sub Demo()
    Dim sh As Worksheet
    Dim rng As Range
    Dim rngBlanks As Range

    ' Get a reference to the sheet you want to process
    Set sh = ActiveSheet

    ' Get a reference to the range of cells to test
    With sh
        Set rng = .Range(.Cells(8, 1), .Cells(.Rows.Count, 1).End(xlUp))
    End With

    ' if there are no blanks SpecialCells will error, so handle it
    On Error Resume Next
    ' Reduce rng to reference only blank cells
    Set rngBlanks = rng.SpecialCells(xlCellTypeBlanks)
    On Error GoTo 0

    ' see if there are any blanks
    If Not rngBlanks Is Nothing Then
        ' delete all of them
        rngBlanks.EntireRow.Delete
    End If
End Sub

Update based on additional info provided: "blank" cells may contain formulas returning an empty string.

Here's an approach using AutoFilter

Sub Demo()
    Dim sh As Worksheet
    Dim rng As Range
    Dim rngBlanks As Range

    Application.ScreenUpdating = False
    ' Get a reference to the sheet you want to process
    Set sh = ActiveSheet

    ' Get a reference to the range of cells to test, plus header row
    With sh
        Set rng = .Range(.Cells(7, 1), .Cells(.Rows.Count, 1).End(xlUp))
    End With

    ' Apply filr to hide non-empty cells
    sh.AutoFilterMode = False
    rng.AutoFilter Field:=1, Criteria1:="=", VisibleDropDown:=True

    ' if there are no blanks SpecialCells will error, so handle it
    On Error Resume Next
    ' Reduce rng to reference only blank cells, exclude header row
    Set rngBlanks = rng.Offset(1, 0).SpecialCells(xlCellTypeVisible)
    On Error GoTo 0

    ' see if there are any blanks
    If Not rngBlanks Is Nothing Then
        ' delete all of them
        rngBlanks.EntireRow.Delete
    End If

    sh.AutoFilterMode = False
    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
this does nothing for me. The empty cells contains formulas, dunno if that has an effect on ur code –  Lahib Apr 10 '13 at 11:30
2  
of course cells containing formulas affect it. Cells containing Formulas arn't empty, event if they return a Null string. You should have included that it the OP. BTW this little gem also effects the accepted answer. –  chris neilsen Apr 11 '13 at 5:09
    
yes indeed it does. But my original example removes the empty rows with the formulas in them. But it does it one row at a time and that is time consuming. I need it to remove all empty rows at once. –  Lahib Apr 11 '13 at 6:48

So basically, if it comes across a blank row, it should delete that row and all the rows below it.

For deleting all the rows below, you could essentially do the same thing that happens when you press CTRL and the down arrow - it goes to either the next value down (if there is one, and in your case it sounds like there won't be) or to the end (row 65536 is the limit in all the Excel versions I've come across). Which would be...

Range(Selection, Selection.End(xlDown)).Select
Selection.Delete Shift:=xlUp

This will go from the row you've selected (so no need to delete it), down to either the next value or the end, and delete all those rows.

EDIT - entire macro:

Dim i As Integer
For i = 1 To 93
    Range("A" & i).Select
    Dim CheckVal As String
    CheckVal = ActiveCell.Value
    If (CheckVal = "") Then
        Range(Selection, Selection.End(xlDown)).Select
        Selection.Delete Shift:=xlUp
    End If
Next i

Bear in mind though that, if there ARE any values below the first "blank" that is found, they are deleted too as the first contiguous value.

share|improve this answer
    
I am running the Macros from excel so i am not selecting any rows. I am inserting data into sheet1 from a database, Sheet2 has reference to fields in sheet1 and sets its fields to the ref. fields. But i have a grid with 100 rows. If the data only has 2 rows represented in sheet2 there will be 98 rows that are empty. I need to run this macro som c# and then remove the 98 rows at once and not one row at a time. Will your code work in this case ? –  Lahib Apr 10 '13 at 8:30
    
The code I suggested is excel code. You should just be able to put that into your macro (instead of the ActiveCell.EntireRow.Delete) and it should work. Don't see why it's been marked down. –  user1560834 Apr 10 '13 at 9:01
    
@user1560834 i dunno why it was marked down. It works fine, but it only selects one column. I need to define the column range it has to select. How can i do that ? –  Lahib Apr 10 '13 at 9:04
    
Why -1? 1: Because it can delete can delete some of the data!. Range(Selection, Selection.End(xlDown)).Select will include the next line of data. 2: it advocate unnecassary use of Select 3: the last version that was limited to 65000 rows was 2003 –  chris neilsen Apr 10 '13 at 9:10
    
Guess that shows how far behind my version of Excel is. I thought that the user didn't have ANY data past the first blank column, so using this would be no problem. Sorry. If there IS data past the first empty row, as Chris Neilsen says, you'll have to cycle through each row. –  user1560834 Apr 10 '13 at 9:15

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