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I know there's plenty of answers on this and most are suggesting looping thru the object, returning what you need, I'm not sure this is the best approach, in my case anyway.

What I have is array with entries referencing to another array people(with id and name) by person_id and projects(with id and name) by project_id.

What I need is to be able to access project and person with a particular id inside the loop on entries, so I can get their names. Doing what others have suggested I'd loop thru people and projects inside each irritation of entries, which seems like awful lot of looping.

So I thought I'd make something I called a "hashtable" from both people and projects on init, which means pretty much creating a new objects people_hashtable and projects_hashtable where key would be the id

so

[
  {
    "id": "8",
    "name": "John Doe"
  }
]

would became

{
    "8": {
        "name": "John Doe"
    }
}

this way I'd have easy access to the name without looping all the time while still maintaining the old array with its original order(that's why I'm not outputting it this way directly from server, you can't quite order an object and I'm using both people and projects in a selectbox, which needs to be ordered by name).

Am I doing it right? Are there better way? Or should I forget this completely and stick with the search loop as suggested in other question?

I'm trying to be as efficient as possible on both server and client side.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You basically doubled all the objects just to avoid loop. So, unless you have some bad performance issues, I would avoid that. In case you really, really need a kind of hashmap, I would prefer storing the array's index instead of another copy of the object:

// array
var arr = [
  {
    "id": "8",
     "name": "John Doe"
  }
];

// lookup table
var lookup = {
  "8": 0
}

Of course doing that, means you can't modifying the array's without rebuild the hashmap.

Generate it's quite simple:

var lookup = arr.reduce(function(lookup, item, index) {
  lookup[item.id] = index;
  return lookup;
}, {});

You can also use that to generate the object you mentioned your question:

var lookup = arr.reduce(function(lookup, item) {
  lookup[item.id] = {name: item.name};
  return lookup;
}, {});

But as I said it's something I would avoid.

share|improve this answer
    
That's interesting! Yeah I suppose that's better than copying the whole object. –  foxx Apr 10 '13 at 9:49
    
reduce seems to be ecma5 stuff though, so I might have to stick to the good old for to build the lookup table –  foxx Apr 10 '13 at 9:54
1  
ES5 is supported in all major and modern browsers; plus ES6 is on the way. If you have to support old browsers like IE8, then I suggest to use always a ES5 shim. Specifically only for reduce can be found on MDN –  ZER0 Apr 10 '13 at 10:02

Following code may help you. JSFIDDLE

var arr = [
  {
    "id": "8",
    "name": "John Doe"
  }
];

var obj = {};
for(var i=0; i< arr.length; i++){
   obj[arr[i].id] = {name: arr[i].name};
}

console.log(obj);
share|improve this answer
    
I know how to do this, I was rather asking for whether it's a good idea. The question was probably lost in the wall of text. Sorry. –  foxx Apr 10 '13 at 9:47
    
Definitely, this is good idea as it make seach fast and easy. –  Anoop Apr 10 '13 at 11:17

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