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I am implementing a smart pointer class as an excerise. Consider the following:

class Base1 {
    protected:
        Base1() : derived_destructor_called(false) {
            printf("Base1::Base1()\n");
        }
    private:
        Base1(const Base1 &); // Disallow.
        Base1 &operator=(const Base1 &); // Disallow.
    protected:
        ~Base1() {
            printf("Base1::~Base1()\n");
            assert(derived_destructor_called);
        }
    protected:
        bool derived_destructor_called;
};

class Derived : public Base1 {
        friend void basic_tests_1();
    private:
        Derived() {printf("Derived::Derived()\n");}
        Derived(const Derived &); // Disallow.
        Derived &operator=(const Derived &); // Disallow.
    public:
        ~Derived() {
            printf("Derived::~Derived()\n");
            derived_destructor_called = true;
        }
        int value;
};

And the following test code:

            Sptr<Derived> sp(new Derived);
            // // Test template copy constructor.
            Sptr<Base1> sp3(sp);

Produces the following error:

Sptr.cpp: In instantiation of ‘my::Sptr<T>::Sptr(const my::Sptr<U>&) [with U = Derived; T = Base1]’:
Sptr.cpp:272:35:   required from here
Sptr.cpp:41:6: error: ‘Derived* my::Sptr<Derived>::obj’ is private
Sptr.cpp:117:86: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp:42:13: error: ‘my::RC* my::Sptr<Derived>::ref’ is private
Sptr.cpp:117:86: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp:43:31: error: ‘std::function<void()> my::Sptr<Derived>::destroyData’ is private
Sptr.cpp:117:86: error: within this context

How is this possible? I am referring to the same class variables inside the same class.!

Below is the template class prototype with its constructor declarations:

template <class T>
class Sptr {
private:
    //some kind of pointer
        //one to current obj
    T* obj;
    RC* ref;
    std::function<void()> destroyData;
public:
    Sptr();
    ~Sptr();

    template <typename U> 
    Sptr(U *);

    Sptr(const Sptr &);

    template <typename U> 
    Sptr(const Sptr<U> &);

    template <typename U> 
    Sptr<T> &operator=(const Sptr<U> &);

    Sptr<T> &operator=(const Sptr<T> &);

    void reset();

    T* operator->() const
    {return obj;};

    T& operator*() const
    {return *obj;};

    T* get() const
    {return &obj;};

    //operator unspecified_bool_type() const;

    //overload *,->,=,copy-constructor

    // const-ness should be preserved.
    // Test for null using safe-bool idiom
    // Static casting, returns a smart pointer
};

EDIT

I declared a template friend as follows inside the template class:

template<typename U> friend class Sptr;

That solved the above error. But it created new errors!

Test code:

        Sptr<Base1> sp2;
        {
            Sptr<Derived> sp(new Derived);
            // // Test template copy constructor.
            Sptr<Base1> sp3(sp);
            sp2 = sp;
            sp2 = sp2;
        }

Error:

Sptr.cpp: In instantiation of ‘my::Sptr<T>& my::Sptr<T>::operator=(const my::Sptr<U>&) [with U = Derived; T = Base1]’:
Sptr.cpp:274:23:   required from here
Sptr.cpp:128:9: error: comparison between distinct pointer types ‘my::Sptr<Base1>*’ and ‘const my::Sptr<Derived>*’ lacks a cast
Sptr.cpp:212:9: error: ‘Base1::~Base1()’ is protected
Sptr.cpp:132:21: error: within this context
Sptr.cpp: In instantiation of ‘my::Sptr<T>& my::Sptr<T>::operator=(const my::Sptr<T>&) [with T = Base1]’:
Sptr.cpp:275:23:   required from here
Sptr.cpp:212:9: error: ‘Base1::~Base1()’ is protected
Sptr.cpp:154:21: error: within this context

How is this possible when I have already made it a template friend? Below the = operator overloaded

template <typename T> 
Sptr<T>& Sptr<T>::operator=(const Sptr<T> &t) {

    std::cout<<"= const <T>\n";
    if(this != &t) {
        if(ref->Release() == 0) {

            if(obj)
                delete obj;

            delete ref;       
        }

        obj = t.obj;
        ref = t.ref;
        destroyData = t.destroyData;
        ref->AddRef();
    }

    return *this;
}
template <typename T> 
template <typename U> 
Sptr<T>& Sptr<T>::operator=(const Sptr<U> &t) {

    std::cout<<"= const <U>\n";
    if(this != &t) {
        if(ref->Release() == 0) {

            if(obj)
                delete obj;

            delete ref;       
        }

        obj = t.obj;
        ref = t.ref;
        destroyData = t.destroyData;
        ref->AddRef();
    }

    return *this;
}
share|improve this question
    
The new errors were not 'created' by the fix, but were likely revealed once the hurdle of the previous mistake was removed. –  Luc Danton Apr 10 '13 at 10:23
    
see my updated answer for the new errors –  Arne Mertz Apr 10 '13 at 10:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The class is different; your constructor is

my::Sptr<Base1>::Sptr(const my::Sptr<Derived>&)

and you're trying to access members of my::Sptr<Derived>.

You need to declare a template friend:

template<typename U> friend class Sptr;
share|improve this answer
    
what you said worked, But look at my question edit. How can I solve that? Its essentially the same problem again. –  footy Apr 10 '13 at 10:12
    
wont all the functions inside it become friends once I declare the template friend you said? –  footy Apr 10 '13 at 10:14
    
@footy yes, that's the case. If you don't want that, either provide public methods to get the pointer and refcount, or provide methods to explicitly convert a Sptr<U> to a Sptr<T> via some constructor that accepts a refcount. –  Arne Mertz Apr 10 '13 at 10:32

I am referring to the same class variables inside the same class.

No, you're not. Maybe you are referring to the same members of the same class template, I guess something like

    template <typename U> 
    Sptr(const Sptr<U> & other) : obj(other.obj), ref(other.ref) {}

But you are not accessing members of the same class, since Sptr<Base> and Sptr<Derived> are different instantiations of the template and thus are different classes that cannot touch each other's privates.

Update to your edit: The error you are getting now is not related to access rights, but it's again related to Sptr<Base> and Sptr<Derived> being different classes, so pointers to them are different pointer types that cannot be compared.
The code you are showing is operator= for the same template instantiation (Sptr<T>), but the error occurs in the operator for a different template instantiation (Sptr<U>). I guess you have the adress comparison in there as well, which is not necessary, since a Sptr<T> cannot have the same address as a Sptr<U>.

The second error about protected ~Base is obvious: you made ~Base protected and nonvirtual, meanong you won't destroy Base objects by deletion of Base* pointers. The same then applies for smart pointers to Base, because they would use polymorphic deletion which you prohibited. Solution: Make the ~Base public and virtual.

share|improve this answer
    
@Ame I know I may sound strange. But thats the test code I HAVE to pass . Whats the work around? Or is there one? –  footy Apr 10 '13 at 10:31
    
Well, the test code is ok, but parts of the Sptr implementation and the declaration of ~Base as nonvirtual protected is not. Change the latter and fix the templated operator= and your test code will work like a charm. –  Arne Mertz Apr 10 '13 at 11:52
    
@Ame can you give me a hint on how to make the operator= work? I am bit new to template styled programming –  footy Apr 10 '13 at 13:11
    
@footy as I said, leave the address comparison, i.e. erase the line if (this != &t) since that is the comparison giving the error and it can never be false. –  Arne Mertz Apr 10 '13 at 13:15
1  
a=a wouldn't be the templated operator=, because both are the same type. A cast to Sptr<Derived> from Sptr<Base>is not trivially possible, but if it was, the cast would give you a temporary Sptr<Derived> object, whose address is clearly not the same as the address of a. You would have two objects pointing to the same ref and object, which won't hurt much, although you would needlessly copy that pointers and release and add the same ref. So while you could check if the ref pointers already are the same, it is not necessary for program correctness. –  Arne Mertz Apr 10 '13 at 14:11

They're not the same class. It looks like it's complaining about you trying to access members of Sptr<Derived> from Sptr<Base1> - look at the type variable instantiations at the start of the error message.

Templates, when their type variables are filled in, generate entirely new classes that just happen to look very similar, so a MyClass<string> is not the same as a MyClass<vector<int>>.

share|improve this answer

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