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I would like to implement a control which displays loaded data one-by-one asynchronously.

So far I have tried async await and yield. With the async await the UI is usable while the data for binding is collected.

With the yield the UI is blocked until the data is collected and binded to the control.

Is it possible to combine the true behaviour of the yield and async/wait?

Thanks

Here is the code:

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Windows;

namespace WPFComponents
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for WindowAsync.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class WindowAsync
    {
        public WindowAsync()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private async void OnWindowLoad(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            ItemListView.ItemsSource = await GetItemsAsync();
            //ItemListView.ItemsSource = GetItems();
        }

        private async Task<ObservableCollection<string>> GetItemsAsync()
        {
            return await Task.Run(() =>
                {
                    ObservableCollection<string> collection = new ObservableCollection<string>();

                    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
                    {
                        string item = string.Format("Current string from {0}.", i);
                        collection.Add(item);
                        Thread.Sleep(500);
                    }
                    return collection;
                });
        }

        private IEnumerable<string> GetItems()
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                string item = string.Format("Current string from {0}.", i);
                Thread.Sleep(500);
                yield return item;
            }
        }
    }
}

Here is the XAML:

<Window x:Class="WPFComponents.WindowAsync"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="WindowAsync" Height="300" Width="300" Loaded="OnWindowLoad">
    <Grid>
        <ListView ScrollViewer.HorizontalScrollBarVisibility="Disabled" x:Name="ItemListView"
                      SelectionMode="Multiple" UseLayoutRounding="True"
                      IsSynchronizedWithCurrentItem="True" Margin="0,4,4,4"
                      BorderThickness="0"
                      HorizontalContentAlignment="Center"
                      VerticalContentAlignment="Top">
            <ListBox.ItemsPanel>
                <ItemsPanelTemplate>
                    <WrapPanel IsItemsHost="True" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
                </ItemsPanelTemplate>
            </ListBox.ItemsPanel>
        </ListView>

    </Grid>
</Window>
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is it possible to combine the true behaviour of the yield and async/wait?

await returns a complete result, but you can use the progress reporting built into the TAP.

I wrote an article about it here: The Progress Reporting Pattern in C# 5 async


So you would do something like this:

private void OnWindowLoad(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
  var collection = new ObservableCollection<string>();
  ItemListView.ItemsSource = collection;

  var progress = new Progress<string>();
  progress.ProgressChanged += ( s, item ) =>
    {
      collection.Add( item ); // will be raised on the UI thread
    }
  ;

  Task.Run( () => GetItemsAndReport( progress ) );
}

void GetItemsAndReport( IProgress<string> progress )
{
    foreach ( var item in GetItems() ) progress.Report( item );
}

private IEnumerable<string> GetItems()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        string item = string.Format("Current string from {0}.", i);
        Thread.Sleep(500);
        yield return item;
    }
}
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This is what I need. Perfect! Hopefully raising the Progress.ProgressChanged event will not add much overhead. Thanks. –  J Pollack Apr 10 '13 at 11:29
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