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Why does the code that you see below give these results?

void loop() {
    byte test = 00000101;
    Serial.print("The byte test is: ");
    Serial.println(test);
    int x = (int)test;
    int y = (int)test<<8;
    Serial.print("The int x is: ");
    Serial.println(x);
    Serial.print("The int shifted y is: ");
    Serial.println(y);

    byte tost = 10000001;
    int z = test + tost;
    Serial.print("The int z is: ");
    Serial.println(z);

    delay(1000);
}

Results:

The byte test is: 65

The int x is: 65

The int shifted y is: 16640

The int z is: 194

While if I change the test to 00000001 it performs great:

Changed code:

void loop() {
    byte test = 00000001;
    Serial.print("The byte test is: ");
    Serial.println(test);
    int x = (int)test;
    int y = (int)test<<8;
    Serial.print("The int x is: ");
    Serial.println(x);
    Serial.print("The int shifted y is: ");
    Serial.println(y);

    byte tost = 10000001;
    int z = test + tost;
    Serial.print("The int z is: ");
    Serial.println(z);

    delay(1000);
}

Results:

The byte test is: 1

The int x is: 1

The int shifted y is: 256

The int z is: 130

My problem is that I have two bytes that I want to read from data registers from an accelerometer. The value is stored in two's complement so I wanted to check since wire.read returns a byte that some people say that is signed and some unsigned if I destroy the values, because I have to do some shifting.

So I wanted to check if I have a byte and I try to shift it and store it to an int, what values do I get, and I want to test if somehow I can store signed byte values inside a byte array.

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5  
Numbers beginning with 0 are octal, not binary, so 00000101 really is 1*64+0*8+1=65. Are you aware of that? –  Alexey Frunze Apr 10 '13 at 10:04
1  
What is byte? This isn't C, is it? –  alk Apr 10 '13 at 10:04
    
@alk Looks like Arduino code, which is C++ more or less. –  unwind Apr 10 '13 at 10:05
    
Also, 10000001 isn't going to fit in a byte, which I'm guessing is 8 bits long in your system. Results are as expected. –  Alexey Frunze Apr 10 '13 at 10:07
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The answer shown above is correct as Alexy Frunze said number starting with 0 is octal .

000000101 is 65 not 5
65 << 8 =16640
10000001 in decimal is 129
129+65 = 194
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:( missed that. OK but can you answer me about a value that is read from and stored as byte and these values are in 2's compliment, i suppose that i have to do the translation and casting is not enough? –  kyrpav Apr 10 '13 at 10:46
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Just because you write a number that "looks binary" since it has a lot of 1s and 0s and is 8 digits wide, doesn't make it magically a binary literal. How would you expect:

byte x = 100;

and

byte x = 100;

to know the value is supposed to be 10010 (one hunded or 1002 (four)?

In fact, C (and C++) don't even have binary literals built-in: a numeric literal starting with 0 is interpreted as octal, base 8.

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