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I have defined a class like this:

 class CircularBuffer {
   private:
     struct entry {
       uint64_t key;
       int nextPtr;
       int prevPtr;
       int delta;
     };

     int head, tail, limit, degree;
     entry *en;
   public:
     CircularBuffer(int a, int b)
     {
       limit = a;
       head = 0;
       tail = limit -1;
       degree = b;
       en = new entry[ limit ];
       for (int i=0; i<limit; i++) {
         en[i].key = 0;
         en[i].delta = 0;
         en[i].nextPtr = 0;
         en[i].prevPtr = 0;
       }
     };
     ~CircularBuffer() { delete [] en; }
  };

And in another file I have included this class (the header file)

 #include "circular.h"
 class foo {
    CircularBuffer cb;
    foo() {}   //ERROR LINE
    void initialize() {
       cb = new CircularBuffer(10, 2);
    }
 };

However this has error which says:

 error: no matching function for call to ‘CircularBuffer::CircularBuffer()’
 note: candidates are: CircularBuffer::CircularBuffer(int, int)
 note:                 CircularBuffer::CircularBuffer(const CircularBuffer&)

and it forces me to do like this:

 #include "circular.h"
 class foo {
    CircularBuffer cb;
    foo()
      : cb( CircularBuffer(10, 2) )
    {}

    void initialize() {}
 };

However I don't want the second implementation. I want the first one. How can I fix that?

share|improve this question
    
what is the error message –  Preet Kukreti Apr 10 '13 at 10:04
    
@mahmood: Your buffer class provokes memory leaks and double deletions, and I am really not sure why you don't want to use initialization, but rather taint your code with arbitrary default constructors. –  phresnel Apr 10 '13 at 10:25
    
Sorry I didn't get the point! can you explain more? –  mahmood Apr 10 '13 at 10:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can add a default constructor

CircularBuffer()
{
    // set a and b to default values
}
share|improve this answer
    
So how can I pass the numbers!? –  mahmood Apr 10 '13 at 10:09
    
Constructors have no return type, so there are no "void constructor"s. –  phresnel Apr 10 '13 at 10:10
    
constructor with a void parameter list, im not a noob –  Quonux Apr 10 '13 at 10:15
1  
Whew, who said you are a noob? However, "default constructor" is the correct wording. But I don't advise on using one if it doesn't make sense for a class to have a default vakue. –  phresnel Apr 10 '13 at 10:18
    
@Quonux Calm down –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 10 '13 at 10:19

Just define cb as a pointer

#include "circular.h"
 class foo {
    CircularBuffer * cb;
    foo() {}   //ERROR LINE
    void initialize() {
       cb = new CircularBuffer(10, 2);
    }
 };

And don't forget to delete cb; somewhere to not leak your memory

share|improve this answer
    
Or even better, a unique_ptr<CircularBuffer>. –  Zyx 2000 Apr 10 '13 at 10:11
3  
Just as a pointer, et voila, it became an exception-unsafe and leaking class that totally ignores the rule of three/five. –  phresnel Apr 10 '13 at 10:11

This should be possible

#include "circular.h"
class foo {
    CircularBuffer cb;
    foo() {}
    void initialize() {
        cb = CircularBuffer(10, 2);
    }
};

The problem with your version was that you were using new, which returns a pointer, but the member variable cb is not a pointer.

However, the best way would be

#include "circular.h"
class foo {
    CircularBuffer cb;
    foo() : cb(10,  2) {}
};

Or, if you want to pass parameters to the constructor

#include "circular.h"
class foo {
    CircularBuffer cb;
    foo(int a, int b) : cb(a,  b) {}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I know that but this implementation is hard to parametrize –  mahmood Apr 10 '13 at 10:11
    
@Zyx 2000: Not possible, because CircularBuffer has no default constructor. –  phresnel Apr 10 '13 at 10:13
1  
@mahmood I don't understand exactly what you bean by parametrizing in this case, because I don't see how it is hard. I edited my answer to give you an example of how to do it. –  Zyx 2000 Apr 10 '13 at 10:15
    
@Zyx 2000: I mean foo() : cb(X, Y) {} and setting X and Y form another function, command line .... –  mahmood Apr 10 '13 at 10:16

and it forces me to do like this:

...
foo()
  : cb( CircularBuffer(10, 2) )
{}
...

However I don't want the second implementation. I want the first one. How can I fix that?

It does not force you to this, but rather to this:

: cb(10, 2)

And this is how you initialize in C++. Everything coming after the opening { is assignment, not initialization.

The "fix" is to use initialization rather than assignment for initialization. There's not much to love or hate about, this is C++.

share|improve this answer

It gives you an error because cb is not a pointer and you are using "new".

But BTW... the constructor initialization is more efficient :D

share|improve this answer
    
But it is hard to parametrzie –  mahmood Apr 10 '13 at 10:06
    
well, it's a personal choice ;) good luck! –  Drewen Apr 10 '13 at 10:08

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