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How many characters are allowed to be in the subject line of Internet email? I had a scan of The RFC for email but could not see specifically how long it was allowed to be. I have a colleague that wants to programmatically validate for it.

If there is no formal limit, what is a good length in practice to suggest? Cheers,

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7  
255 is the limit on some ticketing products (Jira for example) and seems to be the limit on outlook, thunderbird and gmail seem to truncate after 130. –  reconbot Jan 12 '11 at 15:39
    
RFC2047 is better suited to validation, I see lots of bulk-mailing software producing invalid RFC2047 content. –  Jasen Aug 8 at 0:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 91 down vote accepted

See RFC 2822, section 2.1.1 to start.

There are two limits that this standard places on the number of characters in a line. Each line of characters MUST be no more than 998 characters, and SHOULD be no more than 78 characters, excluding the CRLF.

As the RFC states later, you can work around this limit (not that you should) by folding the subject over multiple lines.

Each header field is logically a single line of characters comprising the field name, the colon, and the field body. For convenience however, and to deal with the 998/78 character limitations per line, the field body portion of a header field can be split into a multiple line representation; this is called "folding". The general rule is that wherever this standard allows for folding white space (not simply WSP characters), a CRLF may be inserted before any WSP. For example, the header field:

       Subject: This is a test

can be represented as:

       Subject: This
        is a test

The recommendation for no more than 78 characters in the subject header sounds reasonable. No one wants to scroll to see the entire subject line, and something important might get cut off on the right.

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4  
Current version of the IMF spec, RFC 5322, can be found here: tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5322#section-2.1.1 –  james.garriss Nov 27 '12 at 15:37

after some test: If you send an email to an outlook client, and the subject is >77 chars, and it needs to use "=?ISO" inside the subject (in my case because of accents) then OutLook will "cut" the subject in the middle of it and mesh it all that comes after, including body text, attaches, etc... all a mesh!

I have several examples like this one:

Subject: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Actas de la obra N=BA.20100154 (Expediente N=BA.20100182) "NUEVA RED FERROVIARIA.=

TRAMO=20BEASAIN=20OESTE(Pedido=20PC10/00123-125),=20BEASAIN".?=

To:

As you see, in the subject line it cutted on char 78 with a "=" followed by 2 or 3 line feeds, then continued with the rest of the subject baddly.

It was reported to me from several customers who all where using OutLook, other email clients deal with those subjects ok.

If you have no ISO on it, it doesn't hurt, but if you add it to your subject to be nice to RFC, then you get this surprise from OutLook. Bit if you don't add the ISOs, then iPhone email will not understand it(and attach files with names using such characters will not work on iPhones).

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2  
There are many problems with the subject you set: 1. Spaces should be encoded with '_', 2. An 'encoded-word' (=?charset?Q/B?data?=) may not be more than 75 characters long (rfc2047). 3rd You can not escape new line with '=' char at the end of the line (header QP encoding is different then body QP). Bottom line is: it is not Outlook's fault. –  Pawel Lesnikowski Nov 30 '12 at 12:38

I don't believe that there is a formal limit here, and I'm pretty sure there isn't any hard limit specified in the RFC either, as you found.

I think that some pretty common limitations for subject lines in general (not just e-mail) are:

  • 80 Characters
  • 128 Characters
  • 256 Characters

Obviously, you want to come up with something that is reasonable. If you're writing an e-mail client, you may want to go with something like 256 characters, and obviously test thoroughly against big commercial servers out there to make sure they serve your mail correctly.

Hope this helps!

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8  
There's no particular reason why 256 is any better than 250, or 300, or 372. We're long past using bytes for string lengths. –  Greg Hewgill Oct 20 '09 at 3:46
    
I agree with you for practical purposes, but I think that 256 is better than some of the other options you mentioned since it is more consistent with other products. –  Ed Altorfer Oct 20 '09 at 4:37
    
255 is the actual limit on some products (Jira and outlook for example) –  reconbot Jan 12 '11 at 15:37
3  
This answer is wrong. RFC 5322, the current version of the IMF spec, clearly defines a max line length. See @Michael's answer. –  james.garriss Nov 27 '12 at 15:36
    
+1 The line length limitation is for all lines of the message, but I don't see anything that says you can't have a subject span multiple lines (implying no limitation on the number of characters for the subject). See 2.2.3 and the example that follows directly afterwards. –  Cypher Jun 9 at 18:40

RFC2322 states that the subject header "has no length restriction"

but to produce long headers but you need to split it across multiple lines, a process called "folding".

subject is defined as "unstructured" in RFC 5322

here's some quotes ([...] indicate stuff i omitted)

3.6.5. Informational Fields
  The informational fields are all optional.  The "Subject:" and
  "Comments:" fields are unstructured fields as defined in section
  2.2.1, [...]

2.2.1. Unstructured Header Field Bodies
  Some field bodies in this specification are defined simply as
  "unstructured" (which is specified in section 3.2.5 as any printable
  US-ASCII characters plus white space characters) with no further
  restrictions.  These are referred to as unstructured field bodies.
  Semantically, unstructured field bodies are simply to be treated as a
  single line of characters with no further processing (except for
  "folding" and "unfolding" as described in section 2.2.3).

2.2.3  [...]  An unfolded header field has no length restriction and
  therefore may be indeterminately long.
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