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Is there a fast way of using 64bit ints on 32 x86 machines (in c (added: and c++) language compilers)?

32 bit x86 support 64 bit operations in some extent (there is some movq instruction in old mmx and some other commands probably), but how to use it from c?

What if someone want to use a 64bit ints arithmetic in c on 32 bit x86 machines - how to do it most easy and efficient?

//EdiT

do by now I found some of candidates for it

    uint64_t A;
    long long a;
    int64 a;
    __int64 a;

what should be used ? is there a chance that some implementation of above arthimetic is better/faster than other?

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Whats wrong with types like uint64_t et.al.? –  PlasmaHH Apr 10 '13 at 11:03
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Check whether your compiler supports 64-bit data types such as int64, long long int, int64_t etc. –  Nik Bougalis Apr 10 '13 at 11:04
    
@PlasmaHH I just do not know them - are they avaiable in 32 bit c/c++ compilers, are they fast ? –  user2214913 Apr 10 '13 at 11:10
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@user2214913: That depends on your definition of "fast". –  PlasmaHH Apr 10 '13 at 11:13
    
this definition is - operation is not eleborately emulated in software especially I want to know about: ADD SUB MUL DIV comparsion and assigments ant such basic things (need fast arthimetic to that) –  user2214913 Apr 10 '13 at 11:34

3 Answers 3

To perform 64 bit operations you can use either int64_t or uint64_t.

They are defined in C99 by the header file stdint.h.

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it is efficient on 32 x86 ? what with older c++ compilers and win32? I need general but fast int64 arthimetic on 32-bit machines under win32 :C –  user2214913 Apr 10 '13 at 11:08
    
@user2214913 what's "older"? You keep using these nebulous terms like "fast" and "old". It's like asking us "will an older car have a good 0-60 time?" How can we POSSIBLY answer that question? If you want to get good answers, you need to learn to ask good questions. –  Nik Bougalis Apr 10 '13 at 11:19
    
by fast I mean same as 32bit ints or say twice slower - for example is there possible to get here (32-bit machine win32 and c/c++ language) an 64 bit int division c64=a64/b64; and multiply c64=a64*b64; which is done in hardware and close to 32 bit arthimetic in speed or this is just lame slow emulation? (I do not know too much about x86-32 internals but some 64 bit int operations are accelerated there probably - so it is hardware accelerated and avaliable on 32-bit c/c++ compilers and where or only slowly emulated ) –  user2214913 Apr 10 '13 at 11:25
    
so it is hardware accelerated and avaliable on 32-bit c/c++ compilers(and how)? or only slowly emulated? Want some details - Will be doing some personal research too but it takes time to know) –  user2214913 Apr 10 '13 at 11:32
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I use the microsoft specific __int64 type. This works even with Visual Studio 6 and it's as efficient as is can be on a 32 bit environnment, for example a 64 bit addition will be emulated by two 32 bit ADD instructions. You cannot use native 64 bit instructions in 32 bit mode. –  Michael Walz Apr 10 '13 at 11:32

Is there a fast way of using 64bit ints on 32 x86 machines (in c language compilers)?

int isn't guaranteed to be 64 bits wide; It's guaranteed to be at least 16 bits wide. If you want a type that's guaranteed to be at least 64 bits wide, use long long instead. Talking about optimisation at this level is quite fruitless. You're better off coming up with a complete solution, profiling it to determine what the slowest part of the solution is and targeting that part of your code for optimisation or choosing a different algorithm that performs that slow operation more quickly. Note: By solution, I mean "a program that solves an actual problem".

32 bit x86 support 64 bit operations in some extent (there is some movq instruction in old mmx and some other commands probably), but how to use it from c?

Whether or not your compiler performs the movq and/or mmx optimisations you mentioned automatically is questionable, as you haven't told us which compiler you're using. However, given the simplicity of this sort of optimisation compared to others (eg. dead code optimisation, tail call optimisation, even loop unrolling), I'd guess that your compiler does it automatically. This is another reason talking about optimisation at this level is fruitless; Those who write compilers are usually very good programmers, with a keen understanding of algorithms who can write automaton to perform simple optimisations easily.

What if someone want to use a 64bit ints arithmetic in c on 32 bit x86 machines - how to do it most easy and efficient?

Have you tried compiling a fully-optimised testcase and looking for movq operations in it's machine code? If I haven't convinced you that you should profile your code to determine whether or not this is actually worth targetting, then do this: Compile your solution (something that solves a problem, remember... and compile as "fully optimised"), benchmark it so that you have something to measure your optimisations against, convert the machine code to assembly, perform any manual optimisations in assembly, recompile and benchmark again. You might:

  1. spend a week looking optimising and benchmarking to find that you've shaved a few microseconds and give up... This would be a good indication that your compiler spends a few seconds producing code that is as good as the code you'd take weeks to write. Keep the compiler, but give up on the micro-optimisation.
  2. find a significant optimisation that your compiler doesn't perform (fairly unlikely). Either choose a more optimal compiler, or get in contact with the people who wrote your compiler, and explain it to them...

Either way, progress!

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I was not tested yet and even do not know how type name use for such int64 i want - thats why I am asking. I would like tu use such wide ints mainly to use a wider range fixed point calculations (fixed points used on int32 are narrow and low precision :c So I want to find out if there is something usable to use as int 64 in 32 bit c/c++ codes on 32 bit x86 machines –  user2214913 Apr 10 '13 at 11:41
    
Consider reading this page. –  undefined behaviour Apr 10 '13 at 11:45
    
scaned it all just now - nothing new to me and nothing about int64 arthimetic and its optymistation on 32bit c/c++ –  user2214913 Apr 10 '13 at 12:12
    
Why are you using a C++ compiler to compile C code? That makes no sense, because despite what you may think, C isn't a subset of C++. –  undefined behaviour Apr 10 '13 at 12:57
    
@user2214913 Use a C compiler to compile C code, link the resulting object code into your C++ project using your C++ linker and you won't have problems with code that is defined to behave differently in C than in C++, such as char *foo = malloc(42);, int bar = -4 % 3; or struct VLA_container { size_t size; char VLA[]; };. –  undefined behaviour Apr 10 '13 at 13:02
up vote 0 down vote accepted

As far as I managed to know, there are somewhat eleborated procedures in assemby putted here on 32-bit systems, so probably there is no way of doing accelerated 64-bit multiply or division on 32-bit systems (software routines are used) (This would be a partial answer to that) But i am not sure in 100 % still, so correct this if I am wrong.

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