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I have a bunch of files and would like to sort them according to their date represented in their file name as "2013-03-29_13-56-30". I am using bash.

myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-03-29_13-56-30.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-12-03_17-01-51.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-04_13-49-58.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-04_14-25-51.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-05_10-06-33.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-05_13-49-49.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-08-09_17-48-54.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-11-10_09-46-33.jar

Thanks


I am not sure but sort -n seems enough because of the same prefix in all my files. Is this correct?

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Can you give a little bit more detail about what you're doing? As it stands, those names will be sorted by the date (because the date is the only difference in their names) if you use a glob or even ls to display them. –  kojiro Apr 10 '13 at 11:11
    
I just want to write same as @kojiro . if you want to sort the text in your question. sort input would work because all prefixes are same. and your dateformat is yyyy-mm-dd hh mm ss –  Kent Apr 10 '13 at 11:14
    
I guess the operative question is, are you actually working with these files, or are they really just a list of lines in a text file? –  kojiro Apr 10 '13 at 11:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have the filenames in a file already, and they are disordered, then using sort as in fedorqui's answer will do the trick. But if you have the files on the filesystem, then any tools you use to enumerate them will sort them for you:

$ echo *
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-03-29_13-56-30.jar myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-04_13-49-58.jar myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-04_14-25-51.jar myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-05_10-06-33.jar myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-05_13-49-49.jar myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-08-09_17-48-54.jar myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-11-10_09-46-33.jar myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-12-03_17-01-51.jar
$ ls
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-03-29_13-56-30.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-04_13-49-58.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-04_14-25-51.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-05_10-06-33.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-04-05_13-49-49.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-08-09_17-48-54.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-11-10_09-46-33.jar
myapplication-1.0-SNAPSHOT-V2013-12-03_17-01-51.jar

Now, one thing that can affect this is the LC_COLLATE environment variable. If you're unsure, set it to C.

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