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Below is a simplified example that will cause Eclipses Java system issue a warning Potential resource leak: '<unassigned Closeable value>' may not be closed for the expression new BufferedWriter(...):

    boolean useStdout = askUserWhetherToUseStdout();
    Writer writer = useStdout ? new OutputStreamWriter(System.out) : new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(new File(askUserForFilename())));
    try
    {
        writer.write("Hello World!");
    }
    finally
    {
        writer.close();
    }

Is this a false positive? The way I understood the whole Writer thing, is that any writer will close its underlying writers. In my case, writer will encapsulate the new buffered writer (which in turn encapsulates a file writer), and so closing writer should not leak any resources associated with the buffered writer or in turn, its underlying writers?

What am I missing here?

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3 Answers 3

Edited answer based on updated question:

It's a bogus warning - based on the use of the ternary operator. If the right hand side of operation does not fire then the BufferedWriter is not going to be created, and there is no resource leak. So what the warning describes is really not a possibility. However, if you wanted to 'handle' it, just move the creation of the writer inside your try block.

boolean useStdout = askUserWhetherToUseStdout();
Writer writer = null;
try {
    writer = useStdout ? new OutputStreamWriter(System.out)
            : new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(new File(
                    askUserForFilename())));
    writer.write("Hello World!");
} finally {
    if (writer != null)
        writer.close();
}
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Thank you but actually, I forgot to add try and catch in my example, as they are in the original code. The warning has nothing to do with IOException. I still get the warning, you see.. –  amn Apr 10 '13 at 11:40
    
If the thread your code runs in is killed prior to executing the finally block, the finally block might never get executed, while your app still continues running. Dunno if try-with-resource covers this case, but it seems likely. –  Polygnome Apr 10 '13 at 12:01
    
Those were important details. See updated answer. –  Perception Apr 10 '13 at 12:02

If writer.write("Hello World!"); throws an Exception, writer.close() is never called.

Try wrapping it into a try-catch block (probably making use of the auto-closing feature, see http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/tryResourceClose.html).

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Thank you but actually, I forgot to add try and catch in my example, as they are in the original code. The warning has nothing to do with IOException. I still get the warning, you see.. –  amn Apr 10 '13 at 11:40

Could you check if this code gives you warning? If not then you probably didn't handle IOException while creating writer which should also be done in try block.

boolean useStdout = askUserWhetherToUseStdout();
Writer writer = null;
try {
    writer = useStdout ? new OutputStreamWriter(System.out)
            : new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(new File(
                    askUserForFilename())));
    writer.write("Hello World!");
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    try {
        if (writer != null)
            writer.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

You can also use try-with-resources which will automatically close resource stream after try block.

boolean useStdout = askUserWhetherToUseStdout();
try (Writer writer = useStdout ? new OutputStreamWriter(System.out)
        : new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(new File(
                askUserForFilename())))) {
    writer.write("Hello World!");
} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}
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