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I'm not sure if its a Rspec question, but I only encountred this problem on Rspec tests.

I want to check if an array is equal to another array, regardless of the elements order :

[:b, :a, :c] =?= [:a, :b, :c]

My current version :

my_array.length.should == 3
my_array.should include(:a)
my_array.should include(:b)
my_array.should include(:c)

Is there any method on Rspec, ruby or Rails for do something like this :

my_array.should have_same_elements_than([:a, :b, :c])

Regards

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here was my wrong matcher (thanks @steenslag):

RSpec::Matchers.define :be_same_array_as do |expected_array|
  match do |actual_array|
    (actual_array | expected_array) - (actual_array & expected_array) == []
  end
end

Other solutions:

  • use the builtin matcher, best solution

  • use Set:

Something like:

require 'set'
RSpec::Matchers.define :be_same_array_as do |expected_array|
  match do |actual_array|
    Set.new(actual_array) == Set.new(expected_array)
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
What an elegant solution ! Thanks ! I knew &, but you learned me the operator |. – pierallard Apr 10 '13 at 12:18
    
you're welcome :) – apneadiving Apr 10 '13 at 12:18
    
I didn't downvote, but this fails when there are duplicates: [3,2,1,1] and [1,2,3] returns true. – steenslag Apr 10 '13 at 12:35
    
@steenslag: ([3,2,1,1] | [1,2,3] - [3,2,1,1] & [1,2,3]) => [3, 2, 1] and ([1,2 ,3] | [3, 2, 1, 1] - [1, 2, 3] & [3, 2, 1, 1])=> [1, 2, 3] this doesn't return true since it's different from [] – apneadiving Apr 10 '13 at 12:38
2  
There is no need to go through all this. Just use the builtin operator =~ like in Stefan's answer. – messick Apr 10 '13 at 19:25

There is a match_array matcher in RSpec which does this:

http://rubydoc.info/github/rspec/rspec-expectations/RSpec/Matchers:match_array

share|improve this answer
    
damn, didn't know that, +1 – apneadiving Apr 10 '13 at 12:20
    
Best solution for many people, but I can't install RSpec > 2.11. – pierallard Apr 10 '13 at 12:47
    
Right, available as =~ – Marc-André Lafortune Apr 10 '13 at 13:56

You can use the =~ operator:

[:b, :a, :c].should =~ [:a, :b, :c] # pass

From the docs:

Passes if actual contains all of the expected regardless of order. This works for collections. Pass in multiple args and it will only pass if all args are found in collection.

For RSpec's expect syntax there's match_array:

expect([:b, :a, :c]).to match_array([:a, :b, :c]) # pass

or contain_exactly if you're passing single elements:

expect([:b, :a, :c]).to contain_exactly(:a, :b, :c) # pass
share|improve this answer

This should work.

[:b, :a, :c].sort == [:a, :b, :c].sort
share|improve this answer
    
interesting approach, +1 – apneadiving Apr 10 '13 at 12:19
    
Missing a should. In any case, @Stefan has the right answer. – Marc-André Lafortune Apr 10 '13 at 13:55

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