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I have a List where MyClass has a property 'Name'. I want to know if there are duplicate MyClass with the same Name in the list.

Also, I have a different List and I want to know if there are any duplicates compared to List A.

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Which version of .NET, which VS version are you using? – James Black Oct 20 '09 at 5:06
1  
None of the search results helped? I'm sure this has been asked many times. stackoverflow.com/search?q=list+duplicates+c%23 – Matt Hamilton Oct 20 '09 at 5:07
    
@Matt: I think you answered your own question if all you could do is point me to a generic search term and not a duplicate. But no, I looked, the closest it comes is removing duplicates from a list, not comparison of 2 lists. – esac Oct 20 '09 at 16:18
up vote 6 down vote accepted

To respond to the first question

I want to know if there are duplicate MyClass with the same Name in the list.

you can do this:

bool hasDuplicates = 
  listA.Count != listA.Select(c => c.Name).Distinct().Count();

In response to the second question

Also, I have a different List and I want to know if there are any duplicates compared to List A.

you can do this:

bool hasDuplicates = 
  differentList.Select(c => c.Name).Intersect(listA.Select(c => c.Name)).Any();
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Would I need a custom comparator for the first anser? – DmainEvent Apr 25 '13 at 14:09
    
For what part? The Distinct call will use EqualityComparer<string>.Default internally if you don't provide a IEqualityComparer<string>. Default is described here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms224763.aspx . – G-Wiz Apr 26 '13 at 3:14

To check for duplicate names within one List<MyClass> list:

var names = new HashSet<String>();
foreach (MyClass t in list)
    if(!names.Add(t.Name))
        return "Duplicate name!"
return "No duplicates!"

or variants depending on what you want to do when there are/aren't duplicates. For the case of two separate lists, just build the names set from one list, and loop with this kind of check on the other (details depend on what's supposed to happen for duplicate names within the first list only, within the second list only, or only between one list and the other when each is duplicates-free when considered in isolation -- your specs are way too imprecise to allow me to guess what you want or expect in each of the many possible combinations!

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+1 for mentioning HashSet .. thanks :) – Mahesh Velaga Oct 20 '09 at 5:54
    
@Mahesh, you're welcome -- hash tables are very general tools (though I can see the point of @gwiz's very .NET specific answer of course, the hash-based approach is very widely portable;-). – Alex Martelli Oct 20 '09 at 6:11
    
HashSets are indeed sweet. The asker tagged it C# so I took what IMHO was the C# path of least resistance and greatest readability. I make no claims about its performance =) – G-Wiz Oct 20 '09 at 6:58

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