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In my company, our service implementations basically just pass the call back to the business layer, which does the actual processing. So, for example, if we have a service contract that looks like this:

public interface IService
{
    void ServiceMethod1(string a, object b);
    int ServiceMethod2(int a, int b);
}

Our service might look much like this:

public class Service : IService
{
    private ServiceBL _serviceBL;

    public Service()
    {
        _serviceBL = new ServiceBL();
    }

    public void ServiceMethod1(string a, object b)
    {
        _serviceBL.ServiceMethod1(a, b);
    }

    public int ServiceMethod2(int a, int b)
    {
        return _serviceBL.ServiceMethod2(a, b);
    }
}

Because this gets rather repetitive, I'm wondering if there's some base class I can make that would emit the service methods themselves based on the contract. I would expect the code to maybe look something like this:

public abstract class MagicServiceBase<T>
{
    protected dynamic InterfaceImplementor { get; }

    public MagicServiceBase()
    {
        // Magic that makes the methods defined in T real.
    }
}

public class Service : MagicServiceBase<IService>, IService
{
    protected override dynamic InterfaceImplementor
    {
        get
        {
            return new ServiceBL();
        }
    }
}

Is there a way to create this, or am I just trying to be too lazy for reasonableness?

share|improve this question
    
I think the service and business layers sound like synonyms. One or the other is unnecessary. –  duffymo Apr 10 '13 at 12:38
    
@duffymo: I've generally heard it a good thing to separate out your service contract implementation from the actual business logic. –  zimdanen Apr 10 '13 at 12:51
    
You didn't separate anything; sounds like a pass through. I see no transactions or anything else to distinguish your auto generated service layer. Why generate meaningless code? I have interface-based services, but I give them something meaningful to do. I make them the owners and orchestrators of units of work. –  duffymo Apr 10 '13 at 12:52

1 Answer 1

You should take a look at Agatha (http://davybrion.github.io/Agatha/) This is a framework that removes the requirement of such a setup for your service.

You have to register message requests and responses and it's according handlers.
You can rig this framework to encapsulate all service behaviours you require and you obtain a clean seperation of your handling logic.

A great framework to achieve clean wcf service. Instead of calling yourService.Methods you will actually be dispatching your request and receiving your responses.

share|improve this answer
    
Reading up on this now. –  zimdanen Apr 10 '13 at 12:51

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