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What is the correct way of using C++11's range-based for?

What syntax should be used? for (auto elem : container), or for (auto& elem : container) or for (const auto& elem : container)? Or some other?

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21  
The one that expresses what you want? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 10 '13 at 13:20
2  
Same consideration applies as for function arguments. –  Maxim Egorushkin Apr 10 '13 at 13:24
1  
Actually, this has little to do with range-based for. The same can be said of any auto (const)(&) x = <expr>;. –  Matthieu M. Apr 10 '13 at 14:54
1  
@MatthieuM: This has lot to do with range-based for, of course! Consider a beginner who sees several syntaxes and can't choose which form to use. The point of "Q&A" was to try to shed some light, and explaining the differences of some cases (and discuss cases that compile fine but are kind of inefficient due to useless deep-copies, etc.). –  Mr.C64 Apr 10 '13 at 16:05
2  
@Mr.C64: As far as I am concerned, this has more to do with auto, in general, than with range-based for; you can perfectly use range-based for without any auto! for (int i: v) {} is perfectly fine. Of course, most of the points you raise in your answer may have more to do with the type than with auto... but from the question it is not clear where the pain point is. Personally, I would vie for removing auto from the question; or maybe make it explicit that whether you use auto or explicitly name the type, the question is focused on value/reference. –  Matthieu M. Apr 10 '13 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 104 down vote accepted

Let's start differentiating between observing the elements in the continer vs. modifying them in place.

Observing the elements

Let's consider a simple example:

vector<int> v = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};

for (auto x : v)
    cout << x << ' ';

The above code prints the elements (ints) in the vector:

1 3 5 7 9

Now consider another case, in which the vector elements are not just simple integers, but instances of a more complex class, with custom copy constructor, etc.

// A sample test class, with custom copy semantics.
class X
{
public:
    X() 
        : m_data(0) 
    {}

    X(int data)
        : m_data(data)
    {}

    ~X() 
    {}

    X(const X& other) 
        : m_data(other.m_data)
    { cout << "X copy ctor.\n"; }

    X& operator=(const X& other)
    {
        m_data = other.m_data;       
        cout << "X copy assign.\n";
        return *this;
    }

    int Get() const
    {
        return m_data;
    }

private:
    int m_data;
};

ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const X& x)
{
    os << x.Get();
    return os;
}

If we use the above for (auto x : v) {...} syntax with this new class:

vector<X> v = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};

cout << "\nElements:\n";
for (auto x : v)
{
    cout << x << ' ';
}

the output is something like:

[... copy constructor calls for vector<X> initialization ...]

Elements:
X copy ctor.
1 X copy ctor.
3 X copy ctor.
5 X copy ctor.
7 X copy ctor.
9

As it can be read from the output, copy constructor calls are made during range-based for loop iterations.
This is because we are capturing the elements from the container by value (the auto x part in for (auto x : v)).

This is inefficient code, e.g. if these elements are instances of std::string, heap memory allocations can be done, with expensive trips to the memory manager, etc. This is useless if we just want to observe the elements in a container.

So, a better syntax is available: capture by const reference, i.e. const auto&:

vector<X> v = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};

cout << "\nElements:\n";
for (const auto& x : v)
{ 
    cout << x << ' ';
}

Now the output is:

 [... copy constructor calls for vector<X> initialization ...]

Elements:
1 3 5 7 9

Without any spurious (and potentially expensive) copy constructor call.

So, when observing elements in a container (i.e. for a read-only access), the following syntax is fine for simple cheap-to-copy types, like int, double, etc.:

for (auto elem : container) 

Else, capturing by const reference is better in the general case, to avoid useless (and potentially expensive) copy constructor calls:

for (const auto& elem : container) 

Modifying the elements in the container

If we want to modify the elements in a container using range-based for, the above for (auto elem : container) and for (const auto& elem : container) syntaxes are wrong.

In fact, in the former case, elem stores a copy of the original element, so modifications done to it are just lost and not stored persistently in the container, e.g.:

vector<int> v = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};
for (auto x : v)  // <-- capture by value (copy)
    x *= 10;      // <-- a local temporary copy ("x") is modified,
                  //     *not* the original vector element.

for (auto x : v)
    cout << x << ' ';

The output is just the initial sequence:

1 3 5 7 9

Instead, an attempt of using for (const auto& x : v) just fails to compile.

g++ outputs an error message something like this:

TestRangeFor.cpp:138:11: error: assignment of read-only reference 'x'
          x *= 10;
            ^

The correct approach in this case is capturing by non-const reference:

vector<int> v = {1, 3, 5, 7, 9};
for (auto& x : v)
    x *= 10;

for (auto x : v)
    cout << x << ' ';

The output is (as expected):

10 30 50 70 90

This for (auto& elem : container) syntax works also for more complex types, e.g. considering a vector<string>:

vector<string> v = {"Bob", "Jeff", "Connie"};

// Modify elements in place: use "auto &"
for (auto& x : v)
    x = "Hi " + x + "!";

// Output elements (*observing* --> use "const auto&")
for (const auto& x : v)
    cout << x << ' ';

the output is:

Hi Bob! Hi Jeff! Hi Connie!

The special case of proxy iterators

Suppose we have a vector<bool>, and we want to invert the logical boolean state of its elements, using the above syntax:

vector<bool> v = {true, false, false, true};
for (auto& x : v)
    x = !x;

The above code fails to compile.

g++ outputs an error message similar to this:

TestRangeFor.cpp:168:20: error: invalid initialization of non-const reference of
 type 'std::_Bit_reference&' from an rvalue of type 'std::_Bit_iterator::referen
ce {aka std::_Bit_reference}'
     for (auto& x : v)
                    ^

The problem is that std::vector template is specialized for bool, with an implementation that packs the bools to optimize space (each boolean value is stored in one bit, eight "boolean" bits in a byte).

Because of that (since it's not possible to return a reference to a single bit), vector<bool> uses a so called "proxy iterator" pattern. A "proxy iterator" is an iterator that, when dereferenced, does not yeld an ordinary bool &, but instead returns (by value) a temporary object, which is a proxy class convertible to bool. (See also this question and related answers here on StackOverflow.)

To modify in place the elements of vector<bool>, a new kind of syntax (using auto&&) must be used:

for (auto&& x : v)
    x = !x;

The following code works fine:

vector<bool> v = {true, false, false, true};

// Invert boolean status
for (auto&& x : v)  // <-- note use of "auto&&" for proxy iterators
    x = !x;

// Print new element values
cout << boolalpha;        
for (const auto& x : v)
    cout << x << ' ';

and outputs:

false true true false

Note that the for (auto&& elem : container) syntax works also in the other cases of ordinary (non-proxy) iterators (e.g. for a vector<int> or a vector<string>).

(As a side note, the aforementioned "observing" syntax of for (const auto& elem : container) works fine also for the proxy iterator case.)

Summary

The above discussion can be summarized in the following guide-lines:

  1. For observing the elements, use the following syntax:

    for (const auto& elem : container)    // capture by const reference
    
    • If the objects are cheap to copy (like ints, doubles, etc.), it's possible to use a slightly simplified form:

      for (auto elem : container)    // capture by value
      

                  

  2. For modifying the elements in place, use:

    for (auto& elem : container)    // capture by (non-const) reference
    
    • If the container uses "proxy iterators" (like std::vector<bool>), use:

      for (auto&& elem : container)    // capture by &&
      

Of course, if there is a need to make a local copy of the element inside the loop body, capturing by value (for (auto elem : container)) is a good choice.


Additional notes on generic code

In generic code, since we can't make assumptions about generic type T being cheap to copy, in observing mode it's safe to always use for (const auto& elem : container).
(This won't trigger potentially expensive useless copies, will work just fine also for cheap-to-copy types like int, and also for containers using proxy-iterators, like std::vector<bool>.)

Moreover, in modifying mode, if we want generic code to work also in case of proxy-iterators, the best option is for (auto&& elem : container).
(This will work just fine also for containers using ordinary non-proxy-iterators, like std::vector<int> or std::vector<string>.)

So, in generic code, the following guidelines can be provided:

  1. For observing the elements, use:

    for (const auto& elem : container)
    
  2. For modifying the elements in place, use:

    for (auto&& elem : container)
    
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4  
No advice for generic contexts? :( –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 10 '13 at 13:25
5  
Why not always use auto&&? Is there an const auto&&? –  Martin Ba Apr 10 '13 at 13:31
1  
I guess you are missing the case where you actually do need a copy inside of the loop? –  juanchopanza Apr 10 '13 at 13:36
3  
"If the container uses "proxy iterators"" - and you know it uses "proxy iterators" (which might not be the case in generic code). So I think the best is indeed auto&&, since it covers auto& equally well. –  Christian Rau Apr 10 '13 at 14:20
3  
Thank you, that was a really great "crash course introduction" to the syntax of and some tips for the range based for, for a C# programmer. +1. –  AndrewJacksonZA Apr 12 '13 at 7:27

There is no correct way to use for (auto elem : container), or for (auto& elem : container) or for (const auto& elem : container). You just express what you want.

Let me elaborate on that. Let's take a stroll.

for (auto elem : container) ...

This one is syntactic sugar for:

for(auto it = container.begin(); it != container.end(); ++it) {

    // Observe that this is a copy by value.
    auto elem = *it;

}

You can use this one if it your container contains elements which are cheap to copy.

for (auto& elem : container) ...

This one is syntactic sugar for:

for(auto it = container.begin(); it != container.end(); ++it) {

    // Now you're directly modifying the elements
    // because elem is an lvalue reference
    auto& elem = *it;

}

Use this when you want to write to the elements in the container directly, for example.

for (const auto& elem : container) ...

This one is syntactic sugar for:

for(auto it = container.begin(); it != container.end(); ++it) {

    // You just want to read stuff, no modification
    const auto& elem = *it;

}

As the comment says, just for reading. And that's about it, everything is "correct" when used properly.

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2  
I intended to give some guidance, with sample codes compiling (but being inefficient), or failing to compile, and explaining why, and try to propose some solutions. –  Mr.C64 Apr 10 '13 at 13:58
2  
@Mr.C64 Oh, I'm sorry -- I've just noticed that this is one of those FAQ-type questions. I'm new to this site. Apologies! Your answer is great, I upvoted it -- but also wanted to provide a more concise version for those who want the gist of it. Hopefully, I'm not intruding. –  user2266240 Apr 10 '13 at 14:17
1  
@Mr.C64 what's the problem with OP answering the question as well? It's just another, valid, answer. –  mfontanini Apr 10 '13 at 14:36
1  
@mfontanini: There is absolutely no problem if someone posts some answer, even better than mine. The final purpose is to give a quality contribution to the community (especially for beginners who may feel kind of lost in front of different syntaxes and different options that C++ offers). –  Mr.C64 Apr 10 '13 at 16:20

The correct means is always

for(auto&& elem : container)

This will guarantee the preservation of all semantics.

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But what if the container only returns modifiable references and i want to make clear that i don't wish to modify them in the loop? Shouldn't i then use auto const & to make my intent clear? –  RedX Apr 10 '13 at 19:40
    
@RedX: What is a "modifiable reference"? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 10 '13 at 20:17
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit int &? A normal, non const, reference. –  RedX Apr 10 '13 at 21:11
    
@RedX: References are never const, and they are never mutable. Anyway, my answer to you is yes, I would. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 10 '13 at 21:42
2  
While this may work, I feel this is poor advice compared to the more nuanced and considered approach given by Mr.C64's excellent and comprehensive answer given above. Reducing to the least common denominator is not what C++ is for. –  Jack Aidley Apr 10 '13 at 22:12

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