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A project I've been working on uses _.debounce().

The Underscore JS documentation for debounce reads as follows:

debounce _.debounce(function, wait, [immediate])

Creates and returns a new debounced version of the passed function that will postpone its execution until after wait milliseconds have elapsed since the last time it was invoked.

This obviously assumes that anyone who wants to know what debounce does, already knows what debounce means.

What does debounce actually do?

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" Returns a function, that, as long as it continues to be invoked, will not be triggered. The function will be called after it stops being called for N milliseconds. If immediate is passed, trigger the function on the leading edge, instead of the trailing." github.com/documentcloud/underscore/blob/7342e289aa9d9/… –  Rob W Apr 10 '13 at 13:35
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Side note: Googling javascript debounce gave this as second hit: davidwalsh.name/function-debounce. –  Felix Kling Apr 10 '13 at 13:43
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I created a quick fiddle that demonstrates the difference between throttle and debounce. Clicking on the buttons should give a pretty clear indication of what each does, which, in turn, should give one an idea when each might be appropriate. jsfiddle.net/krainey/NchmU –  kiprainey Jan 29 at 21:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Basically it throttles calls so if it is called more than once in a short period of time, only one instance will be called.

Why would you use it?

Events like window.onresize fire multiple times in rapid succession. If you need to do a lot of calculations on the new position, you would not want to fire the calculations multiple times. You only want to fire it when the user has finished the resizing event.

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"Throttle" might not be the best word choice, as there seems to be confusion in the community around the difference between throttling and debouncing. 1 2 –  pdoherty926 Sep 7 at 2:59

Description from the source code of underscore.js:

Returns a function, that, as long as it continues to be invoked, will not be triggered. The function will be called after it stops being called for N milliseconds. If 'immediate' is passed, trigger the function on the leading edge, instead of the trailing.

Code it self:

_.debounce = function(func, wait, immediate) {
  var timeout, result;
  return function() {
    var context = this, args = arguments;
    var later = function() {
      timeout = null;
      if (!immediate) result = func.apply(context, args);
    };
    var callNow = immediate && !timeout;
    clearTimeout(timeout);
    timeout = setTimeout(later, wait);
    if (callNow) result = func.apply(context, args);
    return result;
  };
};
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4  
I suggest to refer to a specific commit or tag to make the link more reliable. By referring to the master branch, you'll get an inaccurate anchor when a new commit is added. –  Rob W Apr 10 '13 at 13:38
    
@RobW changed it to the most recent commit. –  JackPoint Apr 10 '13 at 13:42
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Thanks @JackPoint. I wish they'd generate the site docs from the (clearly better quality) source comments. –  mikemaccana Apr 10 '13 at 13:46

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