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I'm trying to develop a "PictureBox" which shows a little circle "orbiting" a big circle. The Key aspects is that this small circle's position (and therefore the overall picture) can change based on a semi-expensive hardware call which I make about every second. I am substituting a "AngleValueTextBox" call to illustrate.

Studying several articles on the topic, this seems to be the proper way to do this:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
  public Form1()
  {
    InitializeComponent();

    AngleValueTextBox_TextChanged(null, null); // Why doesn't this make the box appear on program start?
    PictureBox.Invalidate();  // Or this?
  }

  public class CircleCenterClass { public double X; public double Y; 
    public CircleCenterClass(double X, double Y) { this.X = X; this.Y = Y; }
  }

  CircleCenterClass GetCenterOfOrbitCircle(CircleCenterClass OrbitCenter, double OrbitRadius, double Angle)
  {
    CircleCenterClass Result = new CircleCenterClass(0, 0);
    Result.X = OrbitCenter.X + OrbitRadius * Math.Sin(Angle * (3.141592654 / 180));
    Result.Y = OrbitCenter.Y - OrbitRadius * Math.Cos(Angle * (3.141592654 / 180));
    return Result;
  }

  private void drawPictureBox(Graphics graphics, bool ownGraphics)
  {
    double Angle= 0; 
    // Normally this is an expensive hardware call which I don't want to make more than 
    // once a second.
    try {
      Double.TryParse(AngleValueTextBox.Text, out Angle);
    } catch (Exception e) {
      MessageBox.Show("Could not parse Angle " + 
                       AngleValueTextBox.Text);
    }

    using (Bitmap bitmap = new Bitmap(PictureBox.Width, PictureBox.Height))
    {
      using (Graphics gx = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap))
      {
        double OrbitedCircleRadius = 40;
        CircleCenterClass OrbitedCircleCenter = new CircleCenterClass(60, 60);
        double OrbitingCircleRadius = 7;
        Pen MyRedPen = new Pen(Color.Red, 2f);
        Brush MyBlackBrush = new SolidBrush(Color.Black);

        gx.DrawEllipse(MyRedPen, (Int32)(OrbitedCircleCenter.X - OrbitedCircleRadius),
                                        (Int32)(OrbitedCircleCenter.Y - OrbitedCircleRadius),
                                        (Int32)(2 * OrbitedCircleRadius),
                                        (Int32)(2 * OrbitedCircleRadius));

        CircleCenterClass CircleCenter = GetCenterOfOrbitCircle(
                            OrbitedCircleCenter, OrbitedCircleRadius,
                            Angle);

        gx.FillEllipse(MyBlackBrush, (Int32)(CircleCenter.X - OrbitingCircleRadius),
                                     (Int32)(CircleCenter.Y - OrbitingCircleRadius),
                                     (Int32)(2 * OrbitingCircleRadius),
                                     (Int32)(2 * OrbitingCircleRadius));

        // Draw Electronics box. 
        Graphics g = PictureBox.CreateGraphics();
        g.Clear(BackColor);
        g.DrawImage(bitmap, 0, 0);  
      }
    }
  }

  private void PictureBox_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
  {
    drawPictureBox(e.Graphics,false);
  }

  private void AngleValueTextBox_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
    drawPictureBox(PictureBox.CreateGraphics(), true);
  }
}

Key questions:

  1. I can't get the picture to show up initially (i.e. when the GUI starts up). I've tried adding events to my Form constructor (as you can see) but had no luck. What is the "right" way?

  2. Is there a better way to draw constantly changing graphics?

share|improve this question
    
You cannot draw within the form's constructor. Do it in the Load() event instead. –  Nolonar Apr 10 '13 at 14:03
    
Tried Form Paint event? –  aliassce Apr 10 '13 at 14:09
    
There's no reason to create a new bitmap everytime you paint the circles. You can just draw directly to the Graphics object that's passed into your Paint event handler. For that matter, you don't really need a PictureBox, either, since you're not drawing a static bitmap. You could just as easily use a standard Panel and handle the Paint event. Finally, if the painting produces too much flicker (I don't think it will in your case since you're updating relatively slowly) then you'll have to use a custom control to enable double buffering. –  RogerN Apr 10 '13 at 14:13
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Replace the PictureBox Control with a Panel called PictureBox

or set the Picture Box's Image Property to the created bitmap

Note that this is not a particularly efficient way of doing this.

If the Image is only updated every second, then you could perhaps draw to an image only when the value changes, Keep the bitmap as private property on the form and only copy the bitmap in the paint (much as your doing but take out all the drawing code and only do it when the value changes)

enter image description here

    Bitmap bitmap;
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        bitmap = new Bitmap(PictureBox.Width, PictureBox.Height);
        AngleValueTextBox_TextChanged(null, null); // Why doesn't this make the box appear on program start?
        PictureBox.Invalidate();  // Or this?
    }

    public class CircleCenterClass
    {
        public double X; public double Y;
        public CircleCenterClass(double X, double Y) { this.X = X; this.Y = Y; }
    }

    CircleCenterClass GetCenterOfOrbitCircle(CircleCenterClass OrbitCenter, double OrbitRadius, double Angle)
    {
        CircleCenterClass Result = new CircleCenterClass(0, 0);
        Result.X = OrbitCenter.X + OrbitRadius * Math.Sin(Angle * (3.141592654 / 180));
        Result.Y = OrbitCenter.Y - OrbitRadius * Math.Cos(Angle * (3.141592654 / 180));
        return Result;
    }

    private void drawPictureBox(Graphics graphics, bool ownGraphics)
    {



    }

    private void DrawImage()
    {
        double Angle = 0;
        // Normally this is an expensive hardware call which I don't want to make more than 
        // once a second.
        try
        {
            Double.TryParse(AngleValueTextBox.Text, out Angle);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Could not parse Angle " +
                             AngleValueTextBox.Text);
        }

        using (Graphics gx = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap))
        {
            gx.Clear(BackColor);
            double OrbitedCircleRadius = 40;
            CircleCenterClass OrbitedCircleCenter = new CircleCenterClass(60, 60);
            double OrbitingCircleRadius = 7;
            Pen MyRedPen = new Pen(Color.Red, 2f);
            Brush MyBlackBrush = new SolidBrush(Color.Black);

            gx.DrawEllipse(MyRedPen, (Int32)(OrbitedCircleCenter.X - OrbitedCircleRadius),
                                            (Int32)(OrbitedCircleCenter.Y - OrbitedCircleRadius),
                                            (Int32)(2 * OrbitedCircleRadius),
                                            (Int32)(2 * OrbitedCircleRadius));

            CircleCenterClass CircleCenter = GetCenterOfOrbitCircle(
                                OrbitedCircleCenter, OrbitedCircleRadius,
                                Angle);

            gx.FillEllipse(MyBlackBrush, (Int32)(CircleCenter.X - OrbitingCircleRadius),
                                         (Int32)(CircleCenter.Y - OrbitingCircleRadius),
                                         (Int32)(2 * OrbitingCircleRadius),
                                         (Int32)(2 * OrbitingCircleRadius));
        }
    }

    private void PictureBox_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        e.Graphics.DrawImage(bitmap, 0, 0);
    }

    private void AngleValueTextBox_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        DrawImage();
        PictureBox.Invalidate();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Reorganizing slightly so that I draw the bitmap in global space and then draw it in the Paint event worked well. Only change I needed to make was checking e for "null". Not sure why yet. Thanks! –  user1732234 Apr 11 '13 at 3:01
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Add the draw method call to the Form's Load event.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this and it didn't work, but the comment that putting the events in the constructor wouldn't work was very valid. I hadn't made the distinction that just because a Window Form was 'constructed' meant that it had been 'drawn'. I put in a refresh timer so it shows up almost instantaneously. –  user1732234 Apr 11 '13 at 15:18
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  1. Using CreateGraphics is rarely the correct way to update the display. Just have your paint method do all the painting and call the controls Invalidate() method to update the screen.

  2. Make sure the paint event is wired up (just to make sure). If it wasn't wired up in the designer, make sure this is in the form's constructor:

    PictureBox.Paint += PictureBox_Paint;

    Also, name your controls. PictureBox isn't very descriptive.

  3. Any "semi-expensive hardware call" should be made in a BackgroundWorker so that the UI isn't frozen.

  4. If just continually trying to update the screen with a fresh drawing, use a Timer.

  5. You shouldn't need to create a new bitmap on every single paint call. Either use the given graphic object or use one bitmap that only gets created when the control gets resized.

share|improve this answer
    
1) That's the consensus I seem to have seen. Drawing the bitmap seems to work much better. 2&4) I made a mock-up example for stackoverflow (the "real" code was much more complicated and, believe me, I do tag names). I agree in principal though. 3) Agreed. Actually it's in a separate thread. The reason I mentioned was I didn't want someone suggesting I put an event in the TextBox. 4) Agreed. –  user1732234 Apr 11 '13 at 15:09
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