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Is there a quick way to validate if an NSString is formatted as US currency?

So what I am looking to confirm is that character 0 is a $, the following characters are numeric except for string.length-3 which could be a decimal (showing the change is optional).

So this passes $1000.00 and this passes $1000 but this would fail $1000B.

Thanks

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you didn't say what you're using this in (a user-editable text field, a static label or?), but in general any answer is likely to make use of NSNumberFormatter –  Michael Dautermann Apr 10 '13 at 14:06
    
^\$\d+(?:\.\d{2})?$ –  Joe Apr 10 '13 at 14:06
    
    
@iPatel, if any of these related questions are duplicate of this one, you should vote to close this one as a duplicate –  Michael Dautermann Apr 10 '13 at 14:07

2 Answers 2

One simple way would be to validate the string using this regular expression:

^[$][0-9]+([.][0-9]{2})?$
^ ^   ^  ^  ^   ^   ^  ^^
| |   |  |  |   |   |  ||
| |   |  |  |   |   |  |+-- End-of-input marker 
| |   |  |  |   |   |  +--- Optional
| |   |  |  |   |   +------ Repeated exactly two times
| |   |  |  |   +---------- A decimal digit
| |   |  |  +-------------- A dot (literal)
| |   |  +----------------- Repeated once or more
| |   +-------------------- A decimal digit
| +------------------------ The dollar sign (literal)
+-------------------------- Start-of-input marker

Here is a sample code that uses the above expression:

NSError *error = NULL;
NSRegularExpression *regex = [NSRegularExpression
    regularExpressionWithPattern:@"^[$][0-9]+([.][0-9]{2})?$"
                         options:NSRegularExpressionCaseInsensitive
                           error:&error];
if ([regex numberOfMatchesInString:@"$321.05" options:0 range:NSMakeRange(0, 7)]) {
    NSLog(@"Success");
}
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I upvoted for the awesome explanation of the regex! –  PruitIgoe Apr 10 '13 at 14:28
    
So in your example changing this NSMakeRange(0, string.length) would make it dynamic, right? –  PruitIgoe Apr 10 '13 at 14:29
    
Works in the US. Is there a way generate the regex based on the locale? To match the user's request, I think you'd want a ? after the $ also to make it optional. Also, needs to be extended for commas. –  Marcus Adams Apr 10 '13 at 14:29
    
@PruitIgoe That is correct. I hard-coded 7 because I also hard-coded @"$321.00", but in general you need to supply the correct length. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 10 '13 at 14:31
    
@MarcusAdams That's by design: the OP asked about US dollars. Using the NSNumberFormatterCurrencyStyle solution will accept £12.34 in England and 12.34€ in Germany, which may or may not be desirable. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 10 '13 at 14:34

NSNumberFormatter not only has stringFromNumber, but it also has numberFromString.

NSString *string = @"$1,000.00";
NSNumberFormatter *numberFormatter = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init];
[numberFormatter setNumberStyle: NSNumberFormatterCurrencyStyle];
NSNumber *number = [numberFormatter numberFromString:string];
if (number) {
   // Success
}
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Thanks, that's what I was looking for. –  PruitIgoe Apr 10 '13 at 14:13

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