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i've following problem:

I use the for-loop within R to get specific data from a matrix. my code is as follows.

for(i in 1:100){
   T <- as.Date(as.mondate (STARTLISTING)+i)
   DELIST <- (subset(datensatz_Start_End.frame, TIME <= T))[,1]

   write.table(DELIST, file = paste("tab", i, ".csv"), sep="," )
   print(DELIST)
}

Using print, R delivers the data. Using write.table, R delivers the data into different files.

My aim is to aggregate the results from the for-loop within one matrix. (each row for 'i')

But unfortunately I can not make it.


sorry, i'm a real noob within R.

for(i in 1:100)
{
T <- as.Date(as.mondate (STARTLISTING)+i)
DELIST <- (subset(datensatz_Start_End.frame, TIME <= T))[,1]
assign(paste('b',i,sep=''),DELIST)

}

this delivers 100 objects, which contain my results. But what i need is one matrix/dataframe with 100 columns or one list.

Any ideas?


Hey!

Hence I'm not allowed to edit my own answers, here my (simple) solution as follows:

DELIST <- vector("list",100)
for(i in 1:100)

{
T <- as.Date(as.mondate (STARTLISTING)+i)
DELIST[[i]] <- as.character((subset(datensatz_Start_End.frame, TIME <= T))[,1])
}

DELIST[[99]]  ## it is possible to requist the relevant companies for every 'i'

Thx to everyone!

George

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Please add reproducible sample for good people here to help you. See stackoverflow.com/questions/5963269/… –  Chinmay Patil Apr 10 '13 at 14:36
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want a list you can use lapply instead of loop

LL <- lapply(1:100, 
       function(i) {
         T <- as.Date(as.mondate (STARTLISTING)+i)
         DELIST <- (subset(datensatz_Start_End.frame, TIME <= T))[,1]
         assign(paste('b',i,sep=''),DELIST) 
         }
       )

After that you can rbind results together using do.call

result <- do.call(rbind, LL)

Or if you are confident that columns of all elements of LL are going to be of same, then you can use more efficient rbindlist from package data.table

result <- rbindlist(LL)
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check out rbind function. You can start with empty DELIST.DF and append each row to it inside the loop -

DELIST.DF <- NULL
for(i in 1:100){
   T <- as.Date(as.mondate (STARTLISTING)+i)
   DELIST <- (subset(datensatz_Start_End.frame, TIME <= T))[,1]

   DELIST.DF <- rbind(DELIST.DF, DELIST)

   write.table(DELIST, file = paste("tab", i, ".csv"), sep="," )
   print(DELIST)
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is wrong advise. It will quickly lead to second circle of R hell. –  Chinmay Patil Apr 10 '13 at 14:48
    
Obviously pre-allocation is better than rbind (you can check my other answers elsewhere). But its not black/white. It is fine to use rbind for 100 iterations. You can check the table in the pdf you linked. –  Nishanth Apr 10 '13 at 15:11
    
It will also depend on size of the objects being "rbind"ed. In general it will be pretty inadvisable to grow an object inside a loop. –  Chinmay Patil Apr 10 '13 at 15:16
    
does it? last time I checked, time taken for malloc is independent of object size. I agree that in general it is a bad practice, but in particular (< 100 iterations) it is fine. Premature optimization is not advisable. –  Nishanth Apr 10 '13 at 15:26
    
I meant the memory usage which is of primary concern here. As I understand it, rbind creates a temperory copy of the objects to be bound and hence exponential growth in memory required as no of iteration required. –  Chinmay Patil Apr 10 '13 at 15:37
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