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I want to use boost signals2 with automatic connection management in a multithreaded application. My class inherits from enable_shared_from_this<> and i want to connect a member method from within another member method. The connection might be rebuilt frequently so my code should be as fast as possible (despite from the boost signals2 performance itself):

typedef boost::signals2::signal<void ()> signal_type;

struct Cat : public enable_shared_from_this<Cat>
{
  void meow ();

  void connect (signal_type& s)
  {
    // can't write this
    s.connect (signal_type::slot_type (&Cat::meow, this, _1).track (weak_from_this ()));

    // ok, but slow?! two temporary smart pointers
    weak_ptr<Cat> const myself (shared_from_this ());
    s.connect (signal_type::slot_type (&Cat::meow, this, _1).track (myself));
  }

  // i am missing something like this in the base class
  // protected:
  //   weak_ptr<Cat> const& weak_from_this ();
};

I know that my design goals might be conflicting (automatic connection management and thread safety but also fast code) but anyway:

  1. Why does enable_shared_from_this<> lack direct access to the embedded weak_ptr<>? I can't see an opposing reason. Is there no use case similar to mine?

  2. Is there a faster workaround than the one above?

Edit:

I know i can do somethink like this, but i want to avoid the additional storage/init-check penalty:

template <typename T>
struct enable_weak_from_this : public enable_shared_from_this<T>
{
protected:
  weak_ptr<T> /* const& */ weak_from_this ()
  {
    if (mWeakFromThis.expired ())
    {
      mWeakFromThis = this->shared_from_this ();
    }

    return mWeakFromThis;
  }

private:
  weak_ptr<T> mWeakFromThis;
};
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Who says that's "slow"? What is "slow" about it? –  Nicol Bolas Apr 10 '13 at 15:11
    
I need two temporary smart pointer instances which will result in at least 4 superfluous interlocked operations only to construct a weak_ptr which already exists. –  eel76 Apr 10 '13 at 15:14
    
First, it doesn't "already exist"; see my answer. Second, that doesn't make it slow. Do you have some profiling data that suggests that this is a problem? –  Nicol Bolas Apr 10 '13 at 15:16
    
Since enable_shared_from_this interface is not required to use a weak_ptr, but actually does - why not just make your own enable_weak_from_this? The original is < 80 lines including copyright info and whitespace. You want to do something different than the common case provided for by the library, so you get to do it yourself. –  Useless Apr 10 '13 at 15:26
    
@Useless: No, this is no option. The original implementation is not 80 lines. You forgot about the code which binds the weak_ptr to the object and you have no control of that code either. Besides, i always prefer to use a common implementation, i.e. std or boost. –  eel76 Apr 10 '13 at 15:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The reason you don't have access to the weak_ptr is that enable_shared_from_this doesn't have to use one. Having a weak_ptr is simply one possible implementation of enable_shared_from_this. It is not the only one.

Since enable_shared_from_this is part of the same standard library as shared_ptr, a more efficient implementation could be used than directly storing a weak_ptr. And the committee doesn't want to prevent that optimization.

// ok, but slow?! two temporary smart pointers

That's only one temporary smart pointer. Copy elision/movement should take care of anything but the first object.

share|improve this answer
    
I know that the standard does not define/restrict the actual implementation. However, if the standard provides shared_from_this() it could also provide weak_from_this() without restricting the actual implementation either. An implementation which uses weak_ptr internally can then provide a fast(er) implementation of weak_from_this(). –  eel76 Apr 10 '13 at 15:23
    
Does copy elision really work here? We have weak_ptr => shared_ptr => weak_ptr and not weak_ptr => weak_ptr => weak_ptr here. –  eel76 Apr 10 '13 at 15:24
    
@user2266052: You said that there were "two temporary smart pointers". WP->SP->WP only uses one temporary, the SP (with WP->WP, you still have to copy it). So I assumed that the second was the parameter to weak_ptr's constructor or something. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 10 '13 at 22:52
    
@user2266052: "it could also provide weak_from_this()" You're right; it could. But... why would they? The time for this process is highly unlikely to be a performance issue for anyone. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 10 '13 at 22:55
    
I consider both weak_ptr and shared_ptr a smart pointer. We have two additional smart pointers here (a shared_ptr instance and a weak_ptr instance) and optimization can't eliminate them. I stepped through a (release) build and you can clearly see the four (superfluous) interlocked operations (3 inc/dec and 1 exchange operation for msvc2010 with smart pointers from boost). In a simple single threaded setup, the additional cost can certainly be ignored. Other code (like the signal management stuff in my use case) clearly dominates the overall performance. –  eel76 Apr 11 '13 at 7:10

It might be because there are no shared_ptr referencing the Cat instance. weak_ptr requires there to be at least one active shared_ptr.

Try placing a shared_ptr as member variable and assign to it first in the connect method:

typedef boost::signals2::signal<void ()> signal_type;

struct Cat : public enable_shared_from_this<Cat>
{
  void meow ();
  boost::shared_ptr<Cat> test;

  void connect (signal_type& s)
  {
    test = shared_from_this();
    s.connect (signal_type::slot_type (&Cat::meow, this, _1).track (weak_from_this ()));
  }
};

But basically, there can be no weak_ptr if there are no shared_ptr. And if all shared_ptr disapear while the weak_ptr is still in use, then the weak_ptr could point to an non-existant object.

Note: My test should not be used in production code as it will cause the object to never be deallocated.

share|improve this answer
    
You misunderstood my question. There exists a shared_ptr instance which manages the lifetime of the cat object. I'am not having a problem to make my code work (it does) but to make it fast. –  eel76 Apr 10 '13 at 15:11

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