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I have a complex query that I want to use as the Source of a Merge into a table. This will be executed over millions of rows. Currently I am trying to apply constraints to the data by inserting it into a temp table before the merge.

The operations are:

  • Filter out duplicate data.
  • Join some tables to pull in additional data
  • Insert into the temp table.

Here is the query.

-- Get all Orders that aren't in the system
WITH Orders AS
(
    SELECT *
    FROM [Staging].Orders o
    WHERE NOT EXISTS
    (
        SELECT 1
        FROM Maps.VendorBOrders vbo
        JOIN OrderFact of
        ON of.Id = vbo.OrderFactId
        AND InternalOrderId = o.InternalOrderId
        AND of.DataSetId = o.DataSetId
        AND of.IsDelete = 0
    )
)
INSERT INTO #VendorBOrders
    (
      CustomerId
     ,OrderId
     ,OrderTypeId
     ,TypeCode
     ,LineNumber
     ,FromDate
     ,ThruDate
     ,LineFromDate
     ,LineThruDate
     ,PlaceOfService
     ,RevenueCode
     ,BillingProviderId
     ,Cost
     ,AdjustmentTypeCode
     ,PaymentDenialCode
     ,EffectiveDate
     ,IDRLoadDate
     ,RelatedOrderId
     ,DataSetId
    )
SELECT
     vc.CustomerId
    ,OrderId
    ,OrderTypeId
    ,TypeCode
    ,LineNumber
    ,FromDate
    ,ThruDate
    ,LineFromDate
    ,LineThruDate
    ,PlaceOfService
    ,RevenueCode
    ,bp.Id
    ,Cost
    ,AdjustmentTypeCode
    ,PaymentDenialCode
    ,EffectiveDate
    ,IDRLoadDate
    ,ro.Id
    ,o.DataSetId
FROM
Orders o
-- Join related orders to match orders sharing same instance
JOIN Maps.VendorBRelatedOrder ro
ON ro.OrderControlNumber = o.OrderControlNumber
AND ro.EquitableCustomerId = o.EquitableCustomerId
AND ro.DataSetId = o.DataSetId
JOIN BillingProvider bp
ON bp.ProviderNPI = o.ProviderNPI
-- Join on customers and fail if the customer doesn't exist
LEFT OUTER JOIN [Maps].VendorBCustomer vc
ON vc.ExtenalCustomerId = o.ExtenalCustomerId
AND vc.VendorId = o.VendorId;

I am wondering if there is anything I can do to optimize it for time. I have tried using the DB Engine Tuner, but this query takes 100x more CPU Time than the other queries I am running. Is there anything else that I can look into or can the query not be improved further?

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try using nested CTE to compute the final data that needs to be inserted and finally keep a simple INSERT –  Praveen Nambiar Apr 10 '13 at 15:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

CTE is just syntax

That CTE is evaluated (run) on that join

First just run it as a select statement (no insert)

If the select is slow then:
Move that CTE to a #TEMP so it is evaluated once and materialized
Put an index (PK if applicable) on the three join columns

If the select is not slow then it is insert time on #VendorBOrders
Fist only create PK and sort the insert on the PK so as not to fragment that clustered index
Then AFTER the insert is complete build any other necessary indexes

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Generally when I do speed testing I perform checks on the parts of SQL to see where the problem lies. Turn on the 'Execution plan' and see where a lot of the time is going. Also if you want to just do the quick and dirty highlight your CTE and run just that. Is that fast, yes, move on.

I have at times found a single index being off throws off a whole complex logic of joins by merely having the database do one part of something large and then finding that piece.

Another idea is that if you have a fast tempdb on a production environment or the like, dump your CTE to a temp table as well. Index on that and see if that speeds things up. Sometimes CTE's, table variables, and temp tables lose some performance at joins. I have found that creating an index on a partial object will improve performance at times but you are also putting more load on the tempdb to do this, so keep that in mind.

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Are there any articles on creating optimal indexes? I've been using the tuning engine to suggest indexes, but I'm starting to think that might have been doing more long run harm than good. –  Romoku Apr 10 '13 at 16:39
    
I am weakest on my TSQL knowledge of indexes to be honest. I believe that indexes slow performance of inserts so you want to use them sparingly. However at times with temp tables I have done this successfully: Insert into #Object Select * from thing or Select * into #Object from thing THEN create the index. Thus you get the speed of the inserts without having to add indexes and then you create a full index on everything on a single int field. I know that a lot of times when you have multiple sectors joining there may often be a single breaking point that is the choke point. –  djangojazz Apr 10 '13 at 17:04
    
I'm not sure if this is used in the wild, but could I just drop the indexes before the insert and add them back after? Then again if this thing grows into TB of data that probably won't work. –  Romoku Apr 10 '13 at 17:47
    
Depends on time it takes, testing things in a QA/UAT/BETA and then running production is different. Depends on your size and what timelines you want. You can but it often becomes a question of 'should I?'. The gain is if it is faster. You could try to just disable and then re enable them too. Then maybe do an incremental adjustment to the index after. Recreating indexes from scratch on a production environment can sometimes take a while. For temp tables I suggest it as generally up to a few hundredK or a few mil if it is just ints is not too bad if you have good hardware on the tempdb. –  djangojazz Apr 10 '13 at 20:02

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