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I'm trying to implement merge sort and am getting stuck with the merge function:

Here is my function:

public static void merge(Comparable[] a, Comparable[] aux, int low, int mid, int hi) {
    // Copy the elements to the aux array
    for(int i = low; i < a.length; i++) {
        aux[i] = a[i];
    }

    int i = low, j = mid + 1;
    for (int k = low; k <= hi; k++) {
        if      (i > mid)              a[k] = aux[j++];
        else if (j > hi)               a[k] = aux[i++];
        else if (less(aux[j], aux[i])) a[k] = aux[j++];
        else                           a[k] = aux[i++];
    }
}

Running the following input:

[2, 4, 6, 8, 3, 5, 7, 9]

Produces this result:

[2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 5, 7, 9]

Here is the call itself:

    int mid = 0 + (my_array.length - 0) / 2;
    MergeSort.merge(my_array, my_array, 0, mid -1, my_array.length-1);

I can't quite nail it down.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

a and aux are the same array. So, you first copy the array into itself, which is quite useless. Then, in the second loop, you change the value as it is being read, which mess everything up.

Instead of passing two (identical) arrays, create a new one in the merge method and return it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I totally overlooked the fact I was passing in a reference to the same array and therefore updating that. –  james_dean Apr 10 '13 at 17:28

It seems you actually don't know what merging here means. A merge sort is a divide and conquer algorithm. Here, the conquer part means that you're going to merge two sorted arrays. Thus, to merge them, you always take the lowest item of the two arrays and put it into the next position of the output array, and advancing one position in the array where you took the item from.

Take this merge method as a basic example, just to get the idea.

public class MergeTest {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] sorted1 = new int[] {2, 5, 6, 8, 10};
    int[] sorted2 = new int[] {1, 3, 4, 7, 9};

    int[] result = merge(sorted1, sorted2);
    // returns [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
}

public static int[] merge (int[] input1, int[] input2) {
    int[] output = new int[input1.length + input2.length];

    int pos1 = 0;
    int pos2 = 0;

    while (pos1 < input1.length && pos2 < input2.length) {
        int val1 = input1[pos1];
        int val2 = input2[pos2];

        if (val1 < val2) {
            output[pos1++ + pos2] = val1;
        } else {
            output[pos1 + pos2++] = val2;
        }
    }
    while (pos1 < input1.length) {
        int val = input1[pos1];
        output[pos1++ + pos2] = val;
    }
    while (pos2 < input2.length) {
        int val = input2[pos2];
        output[pos1 + pos2++] = val;
    }
    return output;
}

}

And here's a little extra: the mergeSort method itself.

public static int[] mergeSort (int[] input) {

    if (input.length == 1) {
        return input;
    }

    int middle = input.length / 2;

    // divide
    int[] divided1 = Arrays.copyOfRange(input, 0, middle);
    int[] divided2 = Arrays.copyOfRange(input, middle, input.length);
    // conquer
    int[] sorted1 = mergeSort(divided1);
    int[] sorted2 = mergeSort(divided2);

    return merge(sorted1, sorted2);
}
share|improve this answer
    
While your version is correct, I believe the that operating on the same array allows an improvement in efficiency by reducing they memory overhead need for each array. –  james_dean Apr 10 '13 at 17:33
    
Yes you are right, I know that, but my point was making a correct version without any optimization or error checking. Anyway :) –  Timmos Apr 10 '13 at 19:38

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