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I'm just tinkering with a simple timesheet script and if I do a simple insert into the db all is well. I can update the entry no problem either, my issue is that I want to update AND keep the information (which was working fine with the CONCAT I was using) but as soon as I use the ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE it breaks.

$sql="INSERT INTO sheet(employee, workdate, location, description, timein, timeout, timespent)
VALUES('$employee', CURDATE(), '$location', '$description', '$timein', '$timeout', '$timespent')";
//ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE
//location=VALUES(location),
//description=VALUES(description),
//timein=VALUES(timein),
//timeout=VALUES(timeout),
//timespent=VALUES(timespent)
//WHERE employee=$employee";
echo $sql;echo "<br>";
mysql_query($sql)or die(mysql_error());

If I uncomment the duplicate key I get a "You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'WHERE employee='Eric'' at line 9" error. Only thing I can think of is I'm doing this on a totally empty table but I figured the INSERT would have fixed that up. All my $variables are clean (no PDO, gotta learn that too) just real_escape_string

$sql="INSERT INTO sheet(employee, workdate, location, description, timein, timeout, timespent)
VALUES('$employee', CURDATE(), '$location', '$description', '$timein', '$timeout', '$timespent')
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE
location=VALUES(location),
description=VALUES(description),
timein=VALUES(timein),
timeout=VALUES(timeout),
timespent=VALUES(timespent)
WHERE employee='$employee'";
echo $sql;echo "<br>";
mysql_query($sql)or die(mysql_error());
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What version of MySQL server are you using? –  halfer Apr 10 '13 at 17:40
    
I'm running this on 5.5 through Webmatrix for testing then I upload to my webhost when I'm happy. –  E Martin Laing Apr 10 '13 at 17:43
    
Remove the WHERE condition, mySQL already knows. –  Sammitch Apr 10 '13 at 17:43
    
The reason I have that is because for each employee on each day I want to be able to update all the information based on WHERE employee='$employee' AND workdate=CURDATE() as I just want on table entry per person per day. –  E Martin Laing Apr 10 '13 at 17:44
    
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE will only ever update the single record for which the keys conflict. You cannot have a WHERE condition in it, period. –  Sammitch Apr 10 '13 at 17:46
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4 Answers

According to the documentation for INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE, there should not be a WHERE statement at the end of your query:

$sql="INSERT INTO sheet(employee, workdate, location, description, timein, timeout, timespent)
VALUES('$employee', CURDATE(), '$location', '$description', '$timein', '$timeout', '$timespent')
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE
location=VALUES(location),
description=VALUES(description),
timein=VALUES(timein),
timeout=VALUES(timeout),
timespent=VALUES(timespent)";



Notes:

Recommended API It is recommended to use either the mysqli or PDO_MySQL extensions. It is not recommended to use the old mysql extension for new development, as it has been deprecated as of PHP 5.5.0 and will be removed in the future. A detailed feature comparison matrix is provided below. The overall performance of all three extensions is considered to be about the same. Although the performance of the extension contributes only a fraction of the total run time of a PHP web request. Often, the impact is as low as 0.1%.

  • if you have not already done so, you must properly escape the text variables before using them in your query:

    $employee = mysql_real_escape_string($employee);
    // and so on with the other variables
    

Read How does this SQL injection work? and Why shouldn't I use mysql_* functions in PHP? to learn more on these topics.

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eg:

INSERT INTO table (a,b,c) VALUES (1,2,3)
  ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE c=c+1;

UPDATE table SET c=c+1 WHERE a=1;

if your first column i.e here employee is unique that would be considered for where clause internally

WHERE employee='$employee'

if it wasn't unique it will look for workdate, ...

INSERT INTO sheet(employee, workdate, location, description, timein, timeout, timespent)
VALUES('$employee', CURDATE(), '$location', '$description', '$timein', '$timeout', '$timespent')
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE
[
//columns to be update
location=VALUES(location),
description=VALUES(description),
timein=VALUES(timein),
timeout=VALUES(timeout),
timespent=VALUES(timespent)
]
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Don't use a WHERE clause with ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE. The WHERE is implied by the duplicate key.

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Put the employee in tics. If it is a string it has to have quotes around it. Also put curly braces around the variable.

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sorry, it does have ticks '$employee' I just had them removed because I wanted to see if it made a difference. I've tried with `'" doesn't fix it :( –  E Martin Laing Apr 10 '13 at 17:38
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