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I'm trying to convert a flow chart simple state machine into Verilog code. But I'm somehow stuck with the following, and as I have hardly any knowledge in Verilog I'm probably missing something.

The statemachine detects for an input stream of 0 and 1, if the count of 1s can be divided by 3 (or simply: if there have been 3 times number 1).

enter image description here

module example (
  input clk,
  input rst,
  input input1,
  output output
);

reg state;
reg nextstate;

localparam state2 = 3'd0;
localparam state1 = 3'd1;
localparam state0 = 3'd2;

always @(posedge clk or posedge rst) begin
  if (rst)
    state <= state0;
  else
    state <= nextstate;
end

always @* begin
  case(state)
    state0: begin
      if(input1)
        nextstate = state1;
      end
    state2: begin
      if(input1)
        nextstate = state0;
      end
    state1: begin
      if(input1)
        nextstate = state2;
      end
    default: nextstate = state0;
  endcase
end

always @* begin
  output1 = state0 & input1;
end

endmodule

I'm not sure:

  • do I have to define the inputs + outputs as reg or wire? Or is input and output! sufficient?

  • must I provide a vector dimension for the reg state, nextstate? If yes, how to I know which dimension to pick?

  • can I write these kind of assertions at the end like state0 & input1? Or should I use state = state0 & input1 = ?? - yes, what?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

do I have to define the inputs + outputs as reg or wire? Or is input and output! sufficient?

Inputs are always wires, though it doesn't really matter as you don't assign to them. Outputs are wires by default, though you can also declare output reg if you want a register instead.

must I provide a vector dimension for the reg state, nextstate? If yes, how to I know which dimension to pick?

Yes you must declare a dimension, or else your design will catastrophically fail when verilog silently truncates all your states to 0 or 1. The width of the states should be the same width of the localparams that you use to define the state names, or more generically the width should be log2(number of input states).

can I write these kind of assertions at the end like state0 & input1?

I don't think this is what you want. State0 is just a constant number. If you want to know if the state machine is in state0, then you need to compare the current state with the constant state0. Also you likely don't want a bitwise AND here, so use the regular and &&. Should be:

output = (state == state0) && input1;
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What do you mean exactly by number of input states? Would this be 3 in my case (input1, clock, reset), and thus the dimension vector would be [1:0]? Further: if I assume my states are always either high or low (1 or 0), can I then neglect the vector dimension for the localparams? –  membersound Apr 10 '13 at 18:03
1  
Yes, I just meant the total number of states in your state machine (sorry should have worded that better). You can make the vector as large as you want, but you just have to make sure that if you have a state definition that is N bits wide, that you don't cram it into a field smaller than N bits, or else the top bits will be dropped. –  Tim Apr 10 '13 at 18:04
1  
No, you need a demension for the localparams as well. I think you might be not understanding something, 'states' are not high or low. A state machine has one register which holds the 'current state', and all of the 'states' are just numbers, where each state gets its own unique number. You know what state you're in by comparing the value of the state register to the definition of the parameters. @membersound –  Tim Apr 10 '13 at 18:07
    
Yes as I already wrote I have some understanding problems with this. But your comments help a lot, thanks! Just to make sure, as you said "Yes, I just meant the total number of states in your state machine", again you do not mean total number of inputs + outputs, but only total number of inputs, thus any signal that write "input X,", correct? –  membersound Apr 10 '13 at 18:29
    
No, I meant the number of states in the machine (S0, S1, S2), the number of bubbles in your diagram. Your state machine has three states, therefore you need three separate state numbers. Three unique numbers can only be represented in at least 2 bits (00, 01, 10), so your 'state' reg needs to have 2 bits, to hold these values. The number of states doesn't have anything to do with the number of module inputs or outputs. –  Tim Apr 10 '13 at 18:37
always @* begin
  case(state)
    state0: begin
      if(input1)begin
        nextstate = state1;
         output1 = 0;
      end end
       else begin
        nextstate = state0;
         output1 = 1;
      end
    state2: begin
      if(input1)begin
        nextstate = state0;
        output1   = 1 ;
      end end
      begin
        nextstate = state2;
         output1 = 0;
      end
    state1: begin
      if(input1)begin
        nextstate = state2;
        output1   = 0;
      end end
     else begin
        nextstate = state1;
         output1 = 0;
      end
    default: nextstate = state0;
  endcase
end
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Since the output shpuld make transition from 0 to 1 while the state2 changes to state 0 , I feel its better to assign the outputs along with change in states. –  chitranna Apr 10 '13 at 23:32

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