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Using C#, how can I take the min or max of two enum values?

For example, if I have

enum Permissions
{
    None,
    Read,
    Write,
    Full
}

is there a method that lets me do Helper.Max(Permissions.Read, Permissions.Full) and get Permissions.Full, for example?

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1  
Wouldn't it be easy enough to write a quick function that takes two of these as a parameter and compares them? – tnw Apr 10 '13 at 18:49
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Enums implement IComparable so you can use:

public static T Min<T>(T a, T b) where T : IComparable
{
    return a.CompareTo(b) <= 0 ? a : b;
}
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Didn't consider that they might implement IComparable - this does the trick properly. – Timothy Shields Apr 10 '13 at 18:57

Since enums are convertible to integer types, you can just do:

   var permissions1 = Permissions.None;
   var permissions2 = Permissions.Full;
   var maxPermission = (Permissions) Math.Max((int) permissions1, (int) permissions2);

Note that this could cause issues if your enum is based on an unsigned type, or a type longer than 32 bits (i.e., long or ulong), but in that case you can just change the type you are casting the enums as to match the type declared in your enum.

I.e., for an enum declared as:

enum Permissions : ulong
{
    None,
    Read,
    Write,
    Full
}

You would use:

   var permissions1 = Permissions.None;
   var permissions2 = Permissions.Full;
   var maxPermission = (Permissions) Math.Max((ulong) permissions1, (ulong) permissions2);
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What if the enum is based on long? – Oded Apr 10 '13 at 18:52
2  
@Oded Then the compiler warning should indicate that pretty clearly and the fix is trivial... – Servy Apr 10 '13 at 18:52
    
@Obed, you would just change the type of your cast to long. – Nick Aceves Apr 10 '13 at 18:54
    
@Servy - Not in a generic function, which the answer by the OP indicates is what they are after. – Oded Apr 10 '13 at 18:55

This is what I came up with because I couldn't find anything in .NET that did this.

public static class EnumHelper
{
    public static T Min<T>(T a, T b)
    {
        return (dynamic)a < (dynamic)b ? a : b;
    }

    public static T Max<T>(T a, T b)
    {
        return (dynamic)a > (dynamic)b ? a : b;
    }
}
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You could cast to the enumeration underlying type (getting it via the Enum.GetUnderlyingType), and do your min/max on that. – Oded Apr 10 '13 at 18:52

I think you want something like this:

public enum Enum1
{
    A_VALUE,
    B_VALUE,
    C_VALUE
}

public enum Enum2
{
    VALUE_1,
    VALUE_2,
    VALUE_3
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Program p = new Program();

        Console.WriteLine(p.EnumMin<Enum1>());
        Console.WriteLine(p.EnumMax<Enum2>());

    }


    T EnumMin<T>()
    {
        T ret; ;
        Array x = Enum.GetValues(typeof(T));
        ret  = (T) x.GetValue(0);
        return ret;
    }

    T EnumMax<T>()
    {
        T ret; ;
        Array x = Enum.GetValues(typeof(T));
        ret = (T)x.GetValue(x.Length-1);
        return ret;
    }

}
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