Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It seems that that you can not use the search_array function in PHP to search the 0 index AND have it evalute as true.

Consider this code for example:

$test=array(100, 101, 102, 103);

if($key=array_search(100,$test)){

     echo $key;

}

else{

     echo "Not found";

} 

The needle '100' is found in the haystack and the key is returned as 0. So far so good, but then when I evaluate whether the search was successful or not it fails because the returned value is 0, equal to false!

The php manual suggests using '!==' but by doing so the key (array index) is not returned, instead either 1 or 0 is returned:

if($key=(array_search(103,$test)!== false)){

}

So how can I successfully search the array, find a match in the 0 index AND have it evaluate as true.

I don't think that it is possible, if so this is a very buggy oversight by the php developers!

Thanks.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by tereško, Benjamin Gruenbaum, HamZa, Mr. Alien, Yogesh Suthar Jun 17 '13 at 10:25

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
It's quite conceited of you to assume your broken code is a "buggy oversight by the PHP developers" when in fact you just don't know what you're doing. –  meagar Apr 10 '13 at 19:14
    
Did you not see the BIG RED BOX? Try to read the documentation and understand the language before you ask such questions. –  cmbuckley Apr 10 '13 at 19:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is explicitly mentioned in the docs. You need to use === or !==. It's pretty straight-forward.

$key = array_search(...);

if ($key !== false) ...
share|improve this answer
    
You could of course use if( ($key = array_search(...)) !== false) –  Niet the Dark Absol Apr 10 '13 at 19:15
    
I read several threads on this, read the manual over and over but couldn't find the answer. I think I had the '!==' in the wrong part of my code. Now working - thanks! –  user2056238 Apr 10 '13 at 19:16

You can't use the shorthand here, that much should be obvious.

$key = array_search(100,$test)
if( $key !== false ) {
  echo $key;
} else {
  echo "Not found";
}
share|improve this answer

The conditional in your second example block gives execution order priority to the !== operator -- you want to do the opposite though.

if (($key = array_search(100,$test)) !== false) {

!== has higher precedence than == which makes the parentheses necessary.

share|improve this answer
if(($key = array_search(103,$test)) !== false){

}
share|improve this answer
$key = array_search($what, $array);
if($key !== false and $array[$key] == $what) {
 return true;
}

it's more secure

share|improve this answer
$test=array(100, 101, 102, 103);

if (($key = array_search(100,$test)) === false) {
    echo "Not found";
} else{
    echo $key;
} 
share|improve this answer