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What does it mean when I use new auto? Consider the expression:

new auto(5)

What is the type of the dynamically allocated object? What is the type of the pointer it returns?

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I couldn't find this question anywhere, so I figured I'd ask it. –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 10 '13 at 19:50
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Gcc says it's an int. –  jrok Apr 10 '13 at 19:52
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C++11 5.3.4/2, it's int. –  zch Apr 10 '13 at 19:54
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Please, don't do this in your public commits, I have enough weird C++ code on my hands already :( –  Joker_vD Apr 10 '13 at 19:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 26 down vote accepted

In this context, auto(5) resolves to int(5).

You are allocating a new int from the heap, initialized to 5.

(So, it's returning an int *)

Quoting Andy Prowl's resourceful answer, with permission:

Per Paragraph 5.3.4/2 of the C++11 Standard:

If the auto type-specifier appears in the type-specifier-seq of a new-type-id or type-id of a new-expression, the new-expression shall contain a new-initializer of the form

( assignment-expression )

The allocated type is deduced from the new-initializer as follows: Let e be the assignment-expression in the new-initializer and T be the new-type-id or type-id of the new-expression, then the allocated type is the type deduced for the variable x in the invented declaration (7.1.6.4):

T x(e);

[ Example:

new auto(1); // allocated type is int
auto x = new auto(’a’); // allocated type is char, x is of type char*

end example ]

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3  
Throw in the standard quote that says why and I'll accept. :P –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 10 '13 at 19:55
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@ulidtko Except Andy and/or Xeo. I think Drew has morals! –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 10 '13 at 20:01
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BITE YOUR TONGUE –  Drew Dormann Apr 10 '13 at 20:02
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Although I haven't copied it, I realize now that the relevant standard reference appeared in the comments before I posted my answer. So I think it is technically fair to "steal" it ;) –  Andy Prowl Apr 10 '13 at 20:11
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@AndyProwl I like your style, Dude. –  Drew Dormann Apr 10 '13 at 20:19

Per Paragraph 5.3.4/2 of the C++11 Standard:

If the auto type-specifier appears in the type-specifier-seq of a new-type-id or type-id of a new-expression, the new-expression shall contain a new-initializer of the form

( assignment-expression )

The allocated type is deduced from the new-initializer as follows: Let e be the assignment-expression in the new-initializer and T be the new-type-id or type-id of the new-expression, then the allocated type is the type deduced for the variable x in the invented declaration (7.1.6.4):

T x(e);

[ Example:

new auto(1); // allocated type is int
auto x = new auto(’a’); // allocated type is char, x is of type char*

end example ]

Therefore, the type of the allocated object is identical to the deduced type of the invented declaration:

auto x(5)

Which is int.

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You beat me to finding the reference, fair and square. +1 :) –  Drew Dormann Apr 10 '13 at 19:57
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@DrewDormann: But you gave the correct answer first, well done ;) –  Andy Prowl Apr 10 '13 at 19:58
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Sanity-checking my answer on the web was worthless when I searched for "new auto"... –  Drew Dormann Apr 10 '13 at 20:02

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