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Here are the relations:

CREATE TABLE employee (
  name    varchar2(15) not null, 
  ssn      char(9),
  sex      char,
  salary   number(10,2),
  dno      number(4),
  primary key (ssn),
  foreign key (dno) references department(dnumber)
);

CREATE TABLE department (
  dname        varchar2(15) not null,
  dnumber      number(4),
  primary key (dnumber),
  unique (dname),
);

Q1: For each department whose average employee salary is more than $30,000, retrieve the department name and the number of employees working for that department.

Q2: Suppose that we want the number of male employees in each department rather than all employees (as in Q1) to calculate the departmental averages and number of employees. Can we specify this query in SQL? Why or why not.

Thanks!

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What have you tried? It appears that you've posted your homework assignment. We're happy to assist but you'll need to show us what you've been able to figure out thus far. –  Justin Cave Apr 10 '13 at 20:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your first query might look like

SELECT d.dname,
       COUNT(*) total_employees
  FROM department d LEFT JOIN
       employee e ON d.dnumber = e.dno
 GROUP BY d.dname
HAVING AVG(e.salary) > 30000;

And the second one

SELECT d.dname,
       COUNT(*) male_employees
  FROM department d LEFT JOIN
       employee e ON d.dnumber = e.dno
 WHERE e.sex = 'M'
 GROUP BY d.dname
HAVING AVG(e.salary) > 30000;

SQLFiddle

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1  
You have a habit to type inner join. Why are you not typing left outer join for the sake of consistency and readability? –  Egor Skriptunoff Apr 10 '13 at 20:41
    
@EgorSkriptunoff How is that relevant to the question/answer and why does it bother you so much? –  peterm Apr 10 '13 at 21:28
    
I am not home yet but I will pull up what I have and try yours tonight. I have a couple of questions for now. Which attribute in employee are you counting? are the joins necessary here and can I do without them? –  maxspiderx Apr 10 '13 at 22:21
    
@maxspiderx COUNT returns number of rows which in your case represent number of employees in a department after join and group. See more on COUNT here. Your goal can be achieved without join using correlated subqueries . That means that two subqueries (for COUNT and AVG) will be executed for each department. See updated sqlfiddle for an example. Read about joins vs subqueries here and here –  peterm Apr 11 '13 at 7:46

If you want to get the number of all employees and the number of male employees in one SQL,you can try this.

SELECT B.DNAME,
COUNT(*) AS TOTAL_EMPLOYEES,
COUNT(CASE WHEN A.SEX='M' THEN A.SEX END) AS MALE_EMPLOYEES,
AVG(A.SAL) AS ALL_AVG,
AVG(CASE WHEN A.SEX='M' THEN A.SAL END) AS MALE_AVG
FROM EMPLOYEE A JOIN DEPARTMENT B
ON A.DNO=B.DNUMBER
GROUP BY B.DNAME
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Looks great. Thanks! –  maxspiderx Apr 11 '13 at 3:15

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