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I read cuda reference manual for about synchronization in cuda but i don't know it clearly. for example why we use cudaDeviceSynchronize() or __syncthreads()? if don't use them what happens, program can't work correctly? what difference between cudaMemcpy and cudaMemcpyAsync in action?
can you show an example that show this difference?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

cudaDeviceSychronize() is used in host code (i.e. running on the CPU) when it is desired that CPU activity wait on the completion of any pending GPU activity. In many cases it's not necessary to do this explicitly, as GPU operations issued to a single stream are automatically serialized, and certain other operations like cudaMemcpy() have an inherent blocking device synchronization built into them. But for some other purposes, such as debugging code, it may be convenient to force the device to finish any outstanding activity.

__syncthreads() is used in device code (i.e. running on the GPU) and may not be necessary at all in code that has independent parallel operations (such as adding two vectors together, element-by-element). However, one example where it is commonly used is in algorithms that will operate out of shared memory. In these cases it's frequently necessary to load values from global memory into shared memory, and we want each thread in the threadblock to have an opportunity to load it's appropriate shared memory location(s), before any actual processing occurs. In this case we want to use __syncthreads() before the processing occurs, to ensure that shared memory is fully populated. This is just one example. __syncthreads() might be used any time synchronization within a block of threads is desired. It does not allow for synchronization between blocks.

The difference between cudaMemcpy and cudaMemcpyAsync is that the non-async version of the call can only be issued to stream 0 and will block the calling CPU thread until the copy is complete. The async version can optionally take a stream parameter, and returns control to the calling thread immediately, before the copy is complete. The async version typically finds usage in situations where we want to have asynchronous concurrent execution.

If you have basic questions about CUDA programming, it's recommended that you take some of the webinars available.

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thank you Robert. –  milad_b Apr 10 '13 at 21:31

Moreover, __syncthreads() becomes really necessary when you have some conditional paths in your code, and then you want to run an operation that depends on several array element. Consider the following example:

int n = threadIdx.x;

if( myarray[n] > 0 )
{
     myarray[n] = - myarray[n];
}
double y = myarray[n] + myarray[n+1]; // Not all threads reaches here at the same time

In the above example, not all threads will have the same execution sequence. Some threads will take longer based on the if condition. When considering the last line of the example, you need to make sure that all the threads had exactly finished the if-condition and updated myarray correctly. If this wasn't the case, y may use some updated and non-updated values. In this case, it becomes a must to add __syncthreads() before evaluating y to overcome this problem:

if( myarray[n] > 0 )
{
     myarray[n] = - myarray[n];
}
__syncthreads(); // All threads will wait till they come to this point
// We are now quite confident that all array values are updated.
double y = myarray[n] + myarray[n+1]; 
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