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I've got a jQuery function that usually works on a Volusion page and for some reason now it's not working. The location.pathname.indexOf targets all pages that have that URL (the site uses GET variables to do searches on the SearchResults.asp page). I've changed the quotations from singles to doubles and I can't seem to figure out anything else to do test it. Does anyone see any syntax errors in this code? There shouldn't be any conflicts since it's only running jQuery (and nothing else like MooTools). I tried to also do an alert of 'Test' after document.ready but nothing happened on the screen. Thanks!

<script>
$(document).ready(function() {  
    if (location.pathname.indexOf('/SearchResults.asp') != -1 ) {
        $('div#content_area').css({'display','none !important'});         
    }
});
</script>
share|improve this question
    
what if you try $(document).on('ready',function(){...});? –  Sharlike Apr 10 '13 at 20:29
    
Are you getting any errors in your console? Have you set a breakpoint before the inside the ready function and/or inside the if block? If so, have the breakpoints been hit? –  Steve Apr 10 '13 at 20:31
    
@Sharlike That will only work if the document isn't already ready and is recommended against in the api documentation. –  Kevin B Apr 10 '13 at 20:49
    
@KevinB I see, thanks for pointing that out :) –  Sharlike Apr 11 '13 at 13:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You have a syntax error.

This:

$('div#content_area').css({'display', 'none !important'});

Should be this:

$('div#content_area').css({'display': 'none !important'});
//                                  ^
//                                  |
//                                  | look here

When using .css() you can use 2 variations.

You can either use it to update a single property which uses the , to separate the name of the CSS property and the value, similar to this:

$('div#content_area').css('display', 'none !important');

Or you can use the new variation, added in jQuery 1.9 which allows you specify multiple styles at once allowing you to specify property-value pairs, similar to this:

$('div#content_area').css({
    'display': 'none !important',
    'border' : 'solid 1px red'
});

css() and !important


There seems to be an issue when trying to apply a style using .css() and !important. there is a bug which was raised a long time ago: The Ticket #2066 which was closed and an alternative was shown in that ticked.

It mentions that as an alternative you can set the cssText similar to this when using the multi-style variation:

$('div#content_area').css({
    'cssText': 'display: none !important'
});

or this when using the single style variation:

$('div#content_area').css('cssText', 'display: none !important');

Though, as the ticked mentions, a word of caution:

You have to be careful setting cssText since it sets/clears everything in the css for that element.

Another alternative, which most likely is the safest given the side-effects of cssText, is to create a separate CSS class and apply that, similar to this:

.alwaysHide{
    display: none !important;
}
$('div#content_area').addClass('alwaysHide');

Hope this helps.

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3  
Dude, you've got some hawk eyes there! –  Calvin L Apr 10 '13 at 20:31
2  
@ShazboticusSShazbot No it wouldn't, because it's an object. –  Calvin L Apr 10 '13 at 20:34
    
Sorry, deleted my comment... posting as an answer because there is some confusion –  Shazboticus S Shazbot Apr 10 '13 at 20:34
1  
@MxmastaMills: It is the !important part which seems to throw it off. Have a look at this fiddle using your CSS. Without the !important it works but when you add it , it doesn't. –  François Wahl Apr 10 '13 at 21:04
1  
Perfect, that's a great answer but more importantly a great lesson in this jQuery's .css() function. I appreciate you digging around and uncovering these little quirks. This will definitely help me immensely moving forward! –  MillerMedia Apr 13 '13 at 0:18

You are trying to use 2 syntax styles.

Either, you need to do this:

<script>
    $(document).ready(function() {  
        if (location.pathname.indexOf('/SearchResults.asp') != -1 ) {
            $('div#content_area').css('display','none !important');         
        }
    });
    </script>

or you need to use this:

<script>
    $(document).ready(function() {  
        if (location.pathname.indexOf('/SearchResults.asp') != -1 ) {
            $('div#content_area').css({'display' : 'none !important'});         
        }
    });
    </script>
share|improve this answer
2  
Generally, I wouldn't use the object {} in this case because you're only setting 1 css style parameter. –  Shazboticus S Shazbot Apr 10 '13 at 20:36
    
Interesting suggestion... I ALWAYS use the object, particularly so that I don't run into the issue the OP is facing (different approaches for single vs multi assignments) –  Steve Apr 10 '13 at 20:39
    
@Steve Let alone dealing with versioning changes when you add those brackets in the future if you will need to change multiple properties. –  Shef Apr 10 '13 at 20:41
    
@Steve is can be quite useful if you are used to or like to use chaining methodology (D3.js is an example library that really pushes chaining). It won't be as pretty here in the comments section, but it is quite legible in text editors: $(".audioContainer").css("position","absolute").css("left", "200px").css("background-color", "#ff0").css("z-index", "1000"); //edited in: I can't do hard returns to break the chain structure in the comments section –  Shazboticus S Shazbot Apr 10 '13 at 20:45
1  
Personally, I use "","" for when I want to only specify 1 css style attribute and I {:} for when I do multiple. –  Shazboticus S Shazbot Apr 10 '13 at 20:53

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