Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to emply the if-lock-if pattern for checking if an object is present in the dictionary in a multithreaded environment. So, the code I am considering looks like so:

private IDictionary<string, SomeType> m_dic = new Dictionary<string, SomeType>();

private SomeType GetSomeObject(string key)
{
  SomeType obj;
  if (!m_dic.TryGetValue(key, out obj))
  {
    lock(m_dic)
    {
      if (!m_dic.TryGetValue(key, out obj))
      {
        m_dic[key] = obj = CreateSomeObject(key);
      }
    }
  }
  return obj;
}

I act on the assumption that even if another thread is inserting the object at the same key right now, the TryGetValue will not return a partially set reference (such thing does not exist in .NET, does it?), rather it will return null and so we enter the protected section and repeat the check.

My question is my assumption correct and the code is right?

Thanks.

EDIT

Let me throw in a restriction. The dictionary is actually a dictionary of singleton objects. So, once an entry is occupied, it is never changed. Just like the Instance property of a singleton - once it is set, it is never changed. Given that constraint, can we use the if-lock-if pattern?

share|improve this question
    
Re the Edit: No, the internal buffers of the Dictionary are still not thread-safe. –  Henk Holterman Oct 20 '09 at 10:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Edited for clarity:

No this is a very bad idea. You can play an if-lock game on something simple and atomic (an int) but a Dictionary is a class with multiple moving parts. Reading and Writing must be synchronized at all times, See the ThreadSafety section on this MSDN page.

share|improve this answer
1  
I know that. But I want to know whether its internal state is going to be corrupted if one thread is asking (TryGetValue) while another thread is writing. Or the returned answer is simply going to be null when in reality there is a valid object already inserted by another thread. If the state is corrupted - then the code is wrong. If, however, TryGetValue simply returned null, then the code is right, because it repeats the call inside a protected section. Please, elaborate your reply. –  mark Oct 20 '09 at 10:43
    
I have edited my question to clear things a bit. MSDN article talks about general cases, my case is special. –  mark Oct 20 '09 at 10:56
    
And what if the order is different? Suppose it is Add Key first, then TryGetValue returns null, because there is no Add Value yet, which brings us to the protected section with the lock. –  mark Oct 20 '09 at 11:00
3  
If TryGetValue is not documented as thread-safe, then the return value in a multi-threaded environment is just not defined. It can be anything. Of course, you could look into the source code of TryGetValue and discover that -- coincidentally -- it returns null in the case you are describing. Even in that case, you should not rely on it (see "Design by contract"), since the precise source code might change in future versions of the Framework. –  Heinzi Oct 20 '09 at 11:06
1  
When Add() adds the Key first then TryGetvalue could throw an OutOfRange Exception. Lots of other things can go wrong as well. –  Henk Holterman Oct 20 '09 at 11:08

From http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/singleton.html:

Locking on objects which other classes can access and lock on (such as the type) risks performance issues and even deadlocks. This is a general style preference of mine - wherever possible, only lock on objects specifically created for the purpose of locking, or which document that they are to be locked on for specific purposes (e.g. for waiting/pulsing a queue). Usually such objects should be private to the class they are used in. This helps to make writing thread-safe applications significantly easier.

Furthermore, double-checked locking is almost always a bad idea. Hence, I would use code similar to the following:

private static readonly object m_padlock = new object();
private IDictionary<string, SomeType> m_dic = new Dictionary<string, SomeType>();

private SomeType GetSomeObject(string key)
{
  SomeType obj;

  lock (m_padlock)
  {
    if (!m_dic.TryGetValue(key, out obj))
    {
      m_dic[key] = obj = CreateSomeObject(key);
    }
  }

  return obj;
}
share|improve this answer
    
But m_dic is private so the argument for m_padlock is weak. I do agree with the second part. –  Henk Holterman Oct 20 '09 at 10:48
    
Having the dedicated lock object is not an issue. My question concentrates on the if-lock-if pattern applicability to dictionaries. –  mark Oct 20 '09 at 10:49
    
I have edited my question to clear things a bit. –  mark Oct 20 '09 at 10:54
    
@Henk: The developer of "Dictionary<,>" might have used lock(this) somewhere. –  Heinzi Oct 20 '09 at 11:00
    
Heinzi, I would expect that to be documented. And avoided by the BCL team. But I suppose that in general you are right. –  Henk Holterman Oct 20 '09 at 11:11

See my comments to the correct reply. Important part is: if you replace Dictionary to Hashtable in your example, this approach will work.

share|improve this answer

In .NET it is not possible to get partially set reference. All read/write reference operations are atomic.

Code looks fine :) But don't forget to add synchronization to the other operations, like INSERT and UPDATE.

share|improve this answer

I think ReaderWriterLock is better than approach in this senario. furthermore, you have multiple readers, but only one writer.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.readerwriterlock.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
The point is try and avoid the penalty of lock when the object is already present in the dictionary. –  mark Oct 20 '09 at 10:57
    
ReaderWriterLockSlim has replaced ReaderWriterLock. –  Sam Harwell Nov 5 '09 at 4:59
    
readerwriterlock isn't that good at all either: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163599.aspx –  SnOrfus Nov 5 '09 at 5:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.