Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a numpy array where each element looks something like this:

['3' '1' '35' '0' '0' '8.05' '2']
['3' '1' '' '0' '0' '8.4583' '0']
['1' '1' '54' '0' '0' '51.8625' '2']

I would like to replace all empty strings like the ones in the second row above, with some default value like 0. How can I do this with numpy?

The ultimate goal is to be able to run this: S.astype(np.float), but I suspect the empty strings are causing problems in the conversion.

share|improve this question
    
so these are numpy string arrays? –  Bitwise Apr 10 '13 at 21:28
    
Yes. It's created using np.array –  Oleksi Apr 10 '13 at 21:29
    
Can't the numpy arrays be used with list comprehensions? –  user1778770 Apr 10 '13 at 21:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If your array is t:

t[t=='']='0'

and then convert it.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, I didn't remember this construct, I was just about to post an answer with list comprehensions, but this is quite shorter! –  user1778770 Apr 10 '13 at 21:42
    
@user1778770 use list comprehension only if you have a list. as long as you have a numpy array, you should take advantage of that. –  Bitwise Apr 10 '13 at 21:45
    
I think you could make your answer even better by adding a link to a page where the construct you've exposed is documented. That's for those beginners who will wonder what's going on. I haven't found one –  user1778770 Apr 10 '13 at 21:53

Just do this first:

s = np.array(['1', '0', ''])
s[s==''] = '0'

s.astype(float)
#array([ 1.,  0.,  0.])
share|improve this answer

Here is an approach that uses map:

def FloatOrZero(value):
    try:
        return float(value)
    except:
        return 0.0


print map(FloatOrZero, ['3', '1', '', '0', '0', '8.4583', '0'])

Outputs:

[3.0, 1.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 8.4583, 0.0]

In case you needed more flexibility

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.