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i dont see what am i doing wrong. I need to to binary calculator which input format is something like "00000001b+00000010b ... the output needs to be in binary too ... the operator can be +,-,*,/.

I want to read the first number and convert it to decimal ... my code is something like this

%include "asm_io.inc"

segment .text
    global _asm_main
_asm_main:
    enter 0,0
    pusha


    call read_int
    cmp al,'b'
    je vypis

vypis:
    call print_int


koniec:
    popa                 ; terminate program
    mov EAX, 0
    leave
    ret

the program works fine when the input start with number one for example (10101010b) but when the input start with zero it dont work properly ...

my question what am i doing wrong or how can i do it better ?


print_int and read_int are functions that are already given to us, they work on 100% ... other functions that i can use are read_char, print_char and print_string ...

read_int:
    enter   4,0
    pusha
    pushf

    lea eax, [ebp-4]
    push    eax
    push    dword int_format
    call    _scanf
    pop ecx
    pop ecx

    popf
    popa
    mov eax, [ebp-4]
    leave
    ret

print_int:
    enter   0,0
    pusha
    pushf

    push    eax
    push    dword int_format
    call    _printf
    pop ecx
    pop ecx

    popf
    popa
    leave
    ret
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems to me like read_int simply returns an integer value (in eax) that has been read by scanf. I'm not sure why you expect the least significant byte of that integer to be 'b'(?).

Although I don't know which scanf implementation you're using, I haven't seen any that will directly read binary numbers. Implementing that functionality yourself is fairly easy though.
Here's some sample code in C showing the principle:

char bin[32];
unsigned int i, value;

scanf("%[01b]", bin);  // Stop reading if anything but these characters
                       // are entered.

value = 0;
for (i = 0; i < strlen(bin); i++) {
    if (bin[i] == 'b')
        break;
    value = (value << 1) + bin[i] - '0';
}
// This last check is optional depending on the behavior you want. It sets
// the value to zero if no ending 'b' was found in the input string.
if (i == strlen(bin)) {
    value = 0;
}
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you helped a lot ... thank you very much :P –  Matej Špilár Apr 11 '13 at 19:27

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