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I am unsure on how to mock an enum singleton class.

public enum SingletonObject{
  INSTANCE;
  private int num;

  protected setNum(int num) {
    this.num = num;
  }

  public int getNum() {
    return num;
  }

I'd like to stub getNum() in the above example, but I can't figure out how to mock the actual SingletonObject class. I thought using Powermock to prepare the test would help since enums are inherently final.

//... rest of test code
@Test
public void test() {
  PowerMockito.mock(SingletonObject.class);
  when(SingletonObject.INSTANCE.getNum()).thenReturn(1); //does not work
}

This is using PowerMockMockito 1.4.10 and Mockito 1.8.5.

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Check similar thread : stackoverflow.com/questions/2302179/mocking-a-singleton-class –  Martin V. Apr 11 '13 at 1:08
    
Thanks Martin, I read through that thread and it looks like its an approach for using the non-enum way of implementing a singleton, and I am able to use mocking properly with that method. However, is there a way to mock an enum singleton class? From what I've gathered, enum singleton class is the recommended method of declaring a singleton after java 1.5. –  Sonwright Gomez Apr 11 '13 at 2:27
    
Re: PowerMock : can i mock enums? –  Joe Apr 15 '13 at 13:27
    
Singletons are evils :) –  MariuszS Apr 26 '13 at 20:16

1 Answer 1

If you want to stub out what INSTANCE returns, you can do it but it's kind of nasty (using reflection & bytecode manipulation). I created & tested a simple project with three classes using the PowerMock 1.4.12 / Mockito 1.9.0. All classes were in the same package.

SingletonObject.java

public enum SingletonObject {
    INSTANCE;
    private int num;

    protected void setNum(int num) {
        this.num = num;
    }

    public int getNum() {
        return num;
    }
}

SingletonConsumer.java

public class SingletonConsumer {
    public String consumeSingletonObject() {
        return String.valueOf(SingletonObject.INSTANCE.getNum());
    }
}

SingletonConsumerTest.java

import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import static org.powermock.api.mockito.PowerMockito.*;

import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import org.powermock.core.classloader.annotations.PrepareForTest;
import org.powermock.modules.junit4.PowerMockRunner;
import org.powermock.reflect.Whitebox;

@RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class)
@PrepareForTest({SingletonObject.class})
public class SingletonConsumerTest {
    @Test
    public void testConsumeSingletonObject() throws Exception {
        SingletonObject mockInstance = mock(SingletonObject.class);
        Whitebox.setInternalState(SingletonObject.class, "INSTANCE", mockInstance);

        when(mockInstance.getNum()).thenReturn(42);

        assertEquals("42", new SingletonConsumer().consumeSingletonObject());
    }
}

The call to the Whitebox.setInternalState replaces INSTANCE with a mock object that you can manipulate within your test.

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