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So I am trying to use the $.Deferred object on a web app to ensure that [prerequisite] has been completed before trying to execute [goal].

Long story short, the real code I want to use this for looks something like...

function QuoteReview(openQuote) {
    //constants
    this.RETIRE_AFTER=180; //...seconds. Do not use cached values older than this, instead, reload them
    this.lastLoadedQuotes=undefined;
    this.quotes=[];
    this.currentQuote={
        chosen:false, 
        id:undefined, 
        loaded:false, 
        name:undefined,
        pricebook:undefined,
        prontoId:undefined,
        state:undefined,
        reviewer:undefined,
        opportunityId:undefined,
        accountCode:undefined,
        items:[],
        lastLoad:undefined 
    };
    var _curQuote=this.currentQuote;
    this.displayQuote=function(forceLoad) {
        //if forceLoad was specified as true, the quote has never been loaded, or the last load is past it's retirement age, load it first
        if (forceLoad || typeof this.currentQuote.lastLoad == "undefined" || ((new Date() - this.currentQuote.lastLoad)/1000)>this.RETIRE_AFTER)
            this.loadQuote().then(this._displayQuote);
        else
            this.displayQuote();
    }
    this._displayQuote=function() {
        console.log(this); //Displays the deferred object
        console.log(self); //reference error (expected)
        console.log(currentQuote); //reference error
        console.log(_curQuote); //reference error
    }
    this.loadQuote=function() {
        if (this.currentQuote.chosen) {
            var self=this;
            return $.getJSON("queries/getQuote.php?id="+encodeURIComponent(this.currentQuote.id),function(data) {
                //TODO add in the error/logged out handling
                data=data.data[0];
                self.currentQuote.name=data.name;
                self.currentQuote.pricebook=data.pricebook;
                self.currentQuote.prontoId=data.prontoId;
                self.currentQuote.state=data.state;
                self.currentQuote.reviewer=data.reviewer;
                self.currentQuote.opportunityId=data.opportunityId;
                self.currentQuote.accountCode=data.accountCode;
                self.currentQuote.items=data.items;
                self.currentQuote.lastLoad=new Date();
                self.currentQuote.loaded=true;
            });
        } else {
            console.log("tried to load quote before it was chosen!");
            return $.Deferred();
        }
    }
}

but I've made some test code to display the issue easier:

function getSomeAjax() {
    return $.getJSON("queries/quoteSearch.php?needle=",function(data) {
        console.log("got the response");
        console.log(data);
        window.someInfo=data;
    });
}
function _useIt() {
    console.log("we would use the data here, doing some dom type stuff");
    console.log(window.someInfo);
    console.log(this);
}
function useIt() {
    getSomeAjax().then(_useIt);
}

(That query just returns some data... it doesn't really matter in this case and we don't do anything with it)

The problem is, that when I get to logging this in the _useIt() function I am seeing the scope of the deferred object. Now this makes total sense, I am calling then - a member of the deferred object, but does anyone know a way around this? If I use .apply(window,[]) it doesn't seem to even call _useIt. Now, seeing as I am just using quoteReview = new QuoteReview(); on the page and I will always have exactly one QuoteReview object, I know that I could just do quoteReview.currentQuote rather than this.currentQuote, and I don't mind doing that if shove comes to push, but I'd also like to know the right way of doing this.

Edit after answered: I ended up using a combination of the answers from Travis and Aesthete in this case. I found that Aesthete's worked for me in the callback function, but then I realized I would need to also make a _curParts, _curQuotes and _curPart variable; also I was using a var self=this assigned within loadQuote() to access the members within the anonymous ajax function, but it seemed like double work (considering self also has all the properties of _curQuote). Instead, I used var self=this in the scope of the whole constructor and used it to access the members both within the anonymous ajax functions and the functions handed to .then() as callbacks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should be able to use closure to solve the problem, although I don't feel it's the best solution.

var _curQuote = this.currentQuote;
this._displayQuote=function() {
  // Use _curQuote, which should just reference the member currentQuote.
}

Have a look at this fiddle, which should hopefully clear up some confusion.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure where this is different from what I have? the _displayQuote function is already defined within the same closure as the currentQuote variable, it loses this scope due to being called by Deferred.then(). –  Chris O'Kelly Apr 11 '13 at 2:05
    
Well if you try this method, which variable can you access? _curQuote or currentQuote? The former remains within the closure of the _displayQuote() function. –  Aesthete Apr 11 '13 at 2:09
    
neither, unfortunately :( –  Chris O'Kelly Apr 11 '13 at 2:19
    
@ChrisO'Kelly - I've made a fiddle for you, have a look at it and see if it helps understand what I'm talking about regarding scope and closure. –  Aesthete Apr 11 '13 at 2:21
1  
I think a variable is only attached to a closure when that variable is actually accessed within the inner scope. So defining var _curQuote = this.currentQuote outside of the function is not enough, like you found out; some code within the inner scope needs to actually use the variable for it to be closed-over. In your case, using console.log within _displayQuote caused the closure to include _curQuote. I think if you then put your breakpoint back, your chrome console technique would work. Also, you could see it in Scope Variables section in dev tools. –  Paul Hoenecke Apr 11 '13 at 5:24

The meaning of this is not always obvious and I wouldn't like to guess what it is in _useIt(). It could be the global namespace or anything within it depending on how the code is organised.

Putting this aside, the first thing to do with the code is to avoid passing data via a global member. As getSomeAjax() returns a Promise-compliant jqXHR, data is passed automatically to chained .then(), and .done() handlers.

For example, your code would simplify as follows :

function getSomeAjax() {
    return $.getJSON("queries/quoteSearch.php?needle=", function(data) {
        console.log("got the response");
        console.log(data);
    });
}
function _useIt(data) {
    console.log("we would use the data here, doing some dom type stuff");
    console.log(data);
}
function useIt() {
    getSomeAjax().then(_useIt);
}

..., which is maybe more understandable with _useIt written anonymously :

function getSomeAjax() {
    return $.getJSON("queries/quoteSearch.php?needle=", function(data) {
        console.log("got the response");
        console.log(data);
    });
}
function useIt() {
    getSomeAjax().then(function(data) {
        console.log("we would use the data here, doing some dom type stuff");
        console.log(data);
    });
}

Note that data appears as the first argument to the anonymous function in the same way it appeared as the first argument to the $.getJSON() callback. The second and third arguments would similarly be available in both functions.

Additionally, the power of .then() is probably not necessary here. .done() will do the job unless you need to filter the Promise by returning a new value or a new Promise to be passed on down an extended method chain, eg. getSomeAjax(...).then(...).then(...).done(...).fail(...).always(...).

share|improve this answer

You need to use closure and a new scoped variable. this depends on the invocation context and will be assigned to the jQuery object like you're seeing.

You might try something like this (snipped from your code):

this.loadQuote=function() {
    var self = this; // This is grabbing the correct context
    return $.getJSON("local/address.php",function(data){
        //success handler. Fills in the this.currentQuote object
        // Here you'll want to use self.currentQuote
    });
}

EDIT: I wanted to provide some samples to clear up some comments. My personal preference is the Underscore.js bind method. If you're not using the framework, you can include your own version of that method and toss it on the function prototype for a cleaner call.

var MyClass = function() {
    this.MyVariable = "Hello World";

    this.MyCallback = function(data) {
        alert(this.MyVariable);
    };

    // Using 'self' variable to preserve invocation context
    //    The important thing is that 'self' is LOCAL ONLY
    //    and the MyCallback method can reliably rely on 'this'
    this.MakeCallSelfVariable = function() {
        var self = this;
        return $.getJSON("url", function(data) {
            self.MyCallback(data);
        }
    };

    // Using Underscore.js _.bind()
    this.MakeCallUnderscore = function() {
        return $.getJSON("url", _.bind(this.MyCallback, this));
    };

    // Using jQuery's options to set the context (obviously
    //    depends on jQuery
    this.MakeCallJQuery = function() {
        return $.ajax({
            dataType: "json",
            url: "url",
            context: this, // Important line
            success: function(data) {
                // Here, 'this' will refer to what you
                //    assigned to context
                this.MyCallback(data);
            }
        });
    };
};
share|improve this answer
    
hey, this solves an issue I hadn't even noticed that I had yet (namely, access to this within the ajax success handler), but doesn't work for the issue with _displayQuote. I'm updating the question with a full version of my code in case that is more helpful. –  Chris O'Kelly Apr 11 '13 at 2:07
1  
The var self = this; method will definitely work, regardless of how you're utilizing the callback, which is why I didn't bother to differentiate them. I noticed in your other comments that you may have found an issue with your debugging, which I trust is tied to this comment. I added some additional examples above that all achieve the same result (preserving a context within a callback). –  Travis Apr 11 '13 at 15:58

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