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Given an array, I wish to find the minimum element to the right of the current element at i where 0=<i<n and store the index of the corresponding minimum element in another array.

For example, I have an array A ={1,3,6,7,8} The result array would contain R={1,2,3,4} .(R array stores indices to min element). I could only think of an O(N^2) approach.. where for each element in A, I would traverse the remaining elements to right of A and find the minimum. Is it possible to do this in O(N)? I want to use the solution to solve another problem.

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3  
Your question makes no sense. Care to reword? –  Amy Blankenship Apr 11 '13 at 1:32
    
@Amy Blankenship For example I have Array A{1,3,6,7,8}, I want to get another array R{1,2,3,4} as the result. where A[R[0]] is minimum element to the right of index 0 in A. , A[R[1]] is minimum element to right of index 1 in A, A[R[2]] is minimum element to right of index 2 in A and so on... –  quirkystack Apr 11 '13 at 1:35
    
@quirkystack Your example doesn't match your problem. If you're looking for the maximum element, then why do you store the index of the minimum element? And what are you looking for the maximum element for? –  Patashu Apr 11 '13 at 1:36
    
@Patashu, Sorry I edited the content now. I want to use the result array with indexes to minimum element as part of another solution. –  quirkystack Apr 11 '13 at 1:42
    
@quirkystack I edited it further, is it correct now? –  Patashu Apr 11 '13 at 1:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should be able to do this in O(n) by filling the array from the right hand side and maintaining the index of the current minimum, as per the following pseudo-code:

def genNewArray (oldArray):
    newArray = new array[oldArray.size]
    saveIndex = -1
    for i = newArray.size - 1 down to 0:
        newArray[i] = saveIndex
        if saveIndex == -1 or oldArray[i] < oldArray[saveIndex]:
            saveIndex = i
    return newArray

This passes through the array once, giving you the O(n) time complexity. It can do this because, once you've found a minimum beyond element N, it will only change for element N-1 if element N is less than the current minimum.

The following Python code shows this in action:

def genNewArray (oldArray):
    newArray = []
    saveIndex = -1
    for i in range (len (oldArray) - 1, -1, -1):
        newArray.insert (0, saveIndex)
        if saveIndex == -1 or oldArray[i] < oldArray[saveIndex]:
            saveIndex = i
    return newArray

oldList = [1,3,6,7,8,2,7,4]
x = genNewArray (oldList)

print "idx", [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7]
print "old", oldList
print "new", x

The output of this is:

idx [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
old [1, 3, 6, 7, 8, 2, 7, 4]
new [5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 7, 7, -1]

and you can see that the indexes at each element of the new array (the second one) correctly point to the minimum value to the right of each element in the original (first one).

Note that I've taken one specific definition of "to the right of", meaning it doesn't include the current element. If your definition of "to the right of" includes the current element, just change the order of the insert and if statement within the loop so that the index is updated first:

idx [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
old [1, 3, 6, 7, 8, 2, 7, 4]
new [0, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 7, 7]

The code for that removes the check on saveIndex since you know that the minimum index for the last element can be found at the last element:

def genNewArray (oldArray):
    newArray = []
    saveIndex = len (oldArray) - 1
    for i in range (len (oldArray) - 1, -1, -1):
        if oldArray[i] < oldArray[saveIndex]:
            saveIndex = i
        newArray.insert (0, saveIndex)
    return newArray
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I don't know if this answers the question or not, but it's the same structure I was thinking of, so +1 –  Patashu Apr 11 '13 at 1:37
    
@quirky, the original question chopped and changed quite a bit between min and max. I've now updated the answer to be for minimum (as per the current question) with the changes required if you want maximum instead. –  paxdiablo Apr 11 '13 at 2:00

Looks like HW. Let f(i) denote the index of the minimum element to the right of the element at i. Now consider walking backwards (filling in f(n-1), then f(n-2), f(n-3), ..., f(3), f(2), f(1)) and think about how information of f(i) can give you information of f(i-1).

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I thought of this solution.. but when we reach the point where we are at the element which is the maximum till that point, we have to start fresh and find the max index again, which will again be linear.I thought this would give me O(N^2) solution again. If the array has all equal elements for instance. –  quirkystack Apr 11 '13 at 2:01
    
I'm confused... Say we know f(i) and we want to compute f(i-1). Note that f(i - 1) = min (a [ f(i) ], a[ i ]), no? Can you give me a counterexample. This operation is O(1) and since we have to compute f(i) for n entries the algorithm is O(n). –  anil Apr 11 '13 at 2:05
    
say A={4,4,4,4} F(0) = 1, F(1) = 2 (but we know this only after going through the remaining array) , F(2) = 3 .. each operation will be O(N)..no? –  quirkystack Apr 11 '13 at 2:09
    
You need to do it in reverse (I said walking backwards in my answer). So first find f(2) = 3, then f(1) = 2 because a[2] <= a[f(2)] = 4, and finally f(0) = 1 because a[1] <= a[f(0)]. –  anil Apr 11 '13 at 2:16
    
@quirky, I think the key there is the phrase "walking backwards". You don't have to recalculate f(n+1) since it's already stored in the new array (getting it is O(1) as stated). –  paxdiablo Apr 11 '13 at 2:16

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