Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm having a little trouble with pointers and figuring out how to use them effectively.

Say I have a case where I'm popping off "Node" objects from a stack in a while loop like so.

while(...) {
   Node obj = stack.top();
   stack.pop();
   //do something with the obj
}

I was thinking to have it run effectively I shouldn't create a new Node each iteration of the loop... So I thought it might be smarter to initialize a Node pointer outside the loop:

Node* obj;
while(...) {
   obj = &stack.top();
   stack.pop();
   //do something with the obj
}

However, when I do this the obj gets deleted with the pop since its a reference...

Would it be more efficient to create a copy and have the pointer point to the copy, or to just create a new Node each iteration. Tell me if I am way off base with my thought process here too, I'm just trying to learn about efficient ways to accomplish this right now.

Edit: This is part of me testing Dijkstra's Algorithm, where I am searching through MANY nodes and it's running slowly, so I am trying to cut down run time as much as possible.

share|improve this question
    
Impossible to guess the relative expense of creating a new node vs. copying an existing one every time -- especially since you haven't shown us anything about what a Node is, so we have no basis for even a wild guess. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 11 '13 at 3:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It really depends on how expensive it is to copy a Node. In your first example, you make a copy of the top() already. It's usually fine enough to do it this way.

However, if you find that it is expensive to copy Nodes (perhaps through some profiling), you could employ something like shared_ptr so that you can take ownership once you do top(), and the subsequent pop() only makes stack remove it's ownership of that Node. Then you would only be initializing shared_ptrs which should be considerably cheaper, if you have evidence that Node copies are the source of your speed issue.

Another thing to consider if the Node has allocated member-data, and you have a copy constructor which copies this allocated data, is that you can perhaps create a function where instead of copying the data, you simply steal the pointers to that data, considering that you are going to delete the Node right afterward anyways. It makes no sense to copy the allocated memory in that situation.

It might make more sense to run it through a profiler first to be sure of what's causing the slow-down in your program, it could just be a natural slow-down as scaled with the input size, as limited by the algorithm implementation itself. If you're not sure that this is the source of the slow speed, it's probably not worth the effort and hassle to optimize this particular aspect of your application.

share|improve this answer
    
great information! Really appreciate it. Pretty inexperienced so I didn't even know what a profiler was. Just ran it through and 41% of the usage is from the push operation of my c++ stl priority queue. " minHeap.push(*currentAdjNode) ". –  Eric Smith Apr 11 '13 at 3:47
    
Sure no problem, glad I could help. Perhaps you'll want to create a separate question for addressing that, detailing your Node's implementation (more or less) to get an idea as to why it could be bottlenecking there. –  Jorge Israel Peña Apr 11 '13 at 3:53

Copying and creating a pointer to the copy is about the same as your first example. To fix your second example:

Node* obj;
while(...) {
    obj = &stack.top();
    // do something with the obj
    stack.pop(); // do this after processing
}

Also, most people would consider this a micro-optimization. Unless your Node class is gigantic and you've already identified this particular snippet as a bottleneck, you'd probably be better off not worrying about it.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course, pointers are kind of silly here when you can use a reference or even better, stack.top() directly. –  Pubby Apr 11 '13 at 3:21
    
True. it will all compile to the same thing anyway –  Wug Apr 11 '13 at 3:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.