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I am trying to implement a mini shell in C that will accept any combo of <,>,>>,|,&. I have it to where It reads commands and executes file redirection etc, however, I cannot seem to find a good tutorial through Google on how to program it to accept any combo of the above commands. The code I have so far is as follows (I deleted what Ive tried for the combination stuff bc I had no clue how to do it and it was a mess) (Some of the non-standard functions are from a library I am using.):

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
int i,j,frv,status,x,fd1;
IS is;
is = new_inputstruct(NULL);

/* read each line of input */
while (get_line(is) >= 0)
{
    if (is->NF != 0)
    {

        /*fork off a new process to execute the command specified */
        frv = fork();
        /* if this is the child process, execute the desired command */
        if (frv == 0)
        {
            if (strcmp(is->fields[is->NF-1],"&") == 0) is->fields[is->NF-1] = NULL;
            while (is->fields[frv] != NULL)
            {
                /* if we see <, make the next file standard input */
                if (strcmp(is->fields[frv],"<") == 0)
                {
                    is->fields[frv] = NULL;
                    fd1 = open(is->fields[frv+1], O_RDONLY);
                    dup2(fd1, 0);
                    close(fd1);

                }
                /* if we see >, make the next file standard output and create/truncate it if needed */
                else if (strcmp(is->fields[frv],">") == 0)
                {
                    is->fields[frv] = NULL;
                    fd1 = open(is->fields[frv+1],O_TRUNC | O_WRONLY | O_CREAT, 0666);
                    dup2(fd1, 1);
                    close(fd1);

                }
                /* if we see >>, make the next file standard output and create/append it if needed */
                else if (strcmp(is->fields[frv],">>") == 0)
                {
                    is->fields[frv] = NULL;
                    fd1 = open(is->fields[frv+1], O_WRONLY | O_APPEND | O_CREAT, 0666);
                    dup2(fd1, 1);
                    close(fd1);

                }
                frv++;
            }
            /* execute the command */
            status = execvp(is->fields[0], is->fields);
            if (status == -1)
            {
                perror(is->fields[0]);
                exit(1);
            }
        }
        /* if this is parent process, check if need to wait or not */
        else
        {
            if (strcmp(is->fields[is->NF-1],"&") != 0) while(wait(&status) != frv);
        }
        /* clean up the values */
        for(j = 0; j < is->NF; j++) is->fields[j] = NULL;
    }
}
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
The book I used to learn this is: UNIX Systems Programming: Communication, Concurrency and Threads by Kay A. Robbins. – luser droog Apr 11 '13 at 4:25
1  
Where is your code that handles |? It isn't on display. There are a lot of related questions (see the RHS of the page) — are you sure the answer is not in any of them? – Jonathan Leffler Apr 11 '13 at 5:30
    
@JonathanLeffler I havent done pipes yet. Thats one of the things Im not sure how to handle when theres a combination of redirection and pipes.. – vol4life27 Apr 11 '13 at 15:24
1  
The | and & symbols mark the end of a command. When there's a pipe, you have another command to process. When there's an ampersand, you simply run the command in the background without waiting. With a pipe, you set the standard output of the LHS command to write side of the pipe, and set the standard input of the RHS command to the read side of the pipe. Then you process other I/O redirections left to right, one at a time. [...continued...] – Jonathan Leffler Apr 11 '13 at 15:28
    
[...continuation...] If that closes the original (pipe) standard output, so be it. So: ls -l 2>&1 >/dev/null | wc -l sends standard output of ls to the pipe, then changes standard error so it goes to the pipe too; then it sends standard output to /dev/null, so in fact the wc -l command only gets to count the number of lines of error output produced by the ls -l command. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 11 '13 at 15:30

You have to tokenize your input command first.

A Token is a collection of one or many signs which does have a meaning.

For example &, |, >, >>, < are tokens.

Take a look here to know how to get started in writing a lexer (its not that complicated).

Maybe a few basics of compilerbuilding could also help.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think you'll find that the tokenization is done by the new_inputstruct() function into the type IS (presumably an abbreviation for 'input struct'). – Jonathan Leffler Apr 11 '13 at 15:31
    
@JonathanLeffler is right. The IS does put each token on each line of input into an array. The number of tokens(fields) on each line is is->NF and the fields are in is->fields – vol4life27 Apr 11 '13 at 15:47

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