Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

R: What's the best way to simulate an arbitrary univariate random variate if only its probability/density function is available?

share|improve this question
    
Awesome question! –  Kshitij Saxena -KJ- Oct 20 '09 at 12:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here is a (slow) implementation of the inverse cdf method when you are only given a density.

den<-dnorm #replace with your own density

#calculates the cdf by numerical integration
cdf<-function(x) integrate(den,-Inf,x)[[1]]

#inverts the cdf
inverse.cdf<-function(x,cdf,starting.value=0){
 lower.found<-FALSE
 lower<-starting.value
 while(!lower.found){
  if(cdf(lower)>=(x-.000001))
   lower<-lower-(lower-starting.value)^2-1
  else
   lower.found<-TRUE
 }
 upper.found<-FALSE
 upper<-starting.value
 while(!upper.found){
  if(cdf(upper)<=(x+.000001))
   upper<-upper+(upper-starting.value)^2+1
  else
   upper.found<-TRUE
 }
 uniroot(function(y) cdf(y)-x,c(lower,upper))$root
}

#generates 1000 random variables of distribution 'den'
vars<-apply(matrix(runif(1000)),1,function(x) inverse.cdf(x,cdf))
hist(vars)
share|improve this answer

To clarify the "use Metropolis-Hastings" answer above:

suppose ddist() is your probability density function

something like:

n <- 10000
cand.sd <- 0.1
init <- 0
vals <- numeric(n)
vals[1] <- init 
oldprob <- 0
for (i in 2:n) {
    newval <- rnorm(1,mean=vals[i-1],sd=cand.sd)
    newprob <- ddist(newval)
    if (runif(1)<newprob/oldprob) {
        vals[i] <- newval
    } else vals[i] <- vals[i-1]
   oldprob <- newprob
}

Notes:

  1. completely untested
  2. efficiency depends on candidate distribution (i.e. value of cand.sd). For maximum efficiency, tune cand.sd to an acceptance rate of 25-40%
  3. results will be autocorrelated ... (although I guess you could always sample() the results to scramble them, or thin)
  4. may need to discard a "burn-in", if your starting value is weird

The classical approach to this problem is rejection sampling (see e.g. Press et al Numerical Recipes)

share|improve this answer

Use cumulative distribution function http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumulative%5Fdistribution%5Ffunction

Then just use its inverse. Check here for better picture http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normal%5Fdistribution

That mean: pick random number from [0,1] and set as CDF, then check Value

It is also called quantile function.

share|improve this answer

You could use metropolis-hastings to get samples from the density.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.