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I have a table called "where_clauses" which contains a bunch of conditions I would like to use for building dynamic queries. I would like to know all possible queries I could perform using this data. Here is my "where_clauses" data...

INSERT INTO where_clauses (id,col_name,clause) VALUES (1,'x','x < 1');
INSERT INTO where_clauses (id,col_name,clause) VALUES (2,'x','x < 2');
INSERT INTO where_clauses (id,col_name,clause) VALUES (3,'x','x < 3');
INSERT INTO where_clauses (id,col_name,clause) VALUES (4,'y','y < 1');
INSERT INTO where_clauses (id,col_name,clause) VALUES (5,'y','y < 2');
INSERT INTO where_clauses (id,col_name,clause) VALUES (6,'y','y < 3');
INSERT INTO where_clauses (id,col_name,clause) VALUES (7,'z','z < 1'); 

Ideally I would like the "all possible queries" in the form of an array of ids. For example, the "all possible queries" result would be...

{1}
{1,4}
{1,4,7}
{1,5}
{1,5,7}
{1,6}
{1,6,7}
{2}
{2,4}
{2,4,7}
{2,5}
{2,5,7}
{2,6}
{2,6,7}
{3}
{3,4}
{3,4,7}
{3,5}
{3,5,7}
{3,6}
{3,6,7}
{4}
{4,7}
{5}
{5,7}
{6}
{6,7}
{7}

Note that im throwing out joining on equal columns. What is a query that would give all possible where_clauses?

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3 Answers 3

This is the sort of problem that the new WITH RECURSIVE is intended to solve. The following generalizes to any number of column names (not just x, y, z).

WITH RECURSIVE subq(a, x) AS
  ( VALUES (ARRAY[]::int[], NULL) /* initial */
    UNION ALL 
    SELECT subq.a || id, col_name FROM subq JOIN where_clauses
    ON x IS NULL OR x < col_name )
SELECT a FROM subq 
WHERE x IS NOT NULL;  /* discard the initial empty array */
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. This looks like what I need. To take it one step further, let's say I add in the clauses INSERT INTO where_clauses (id,col_name,clause) VALUES (8,'x','x > 1');. How could I refactor this query so that I could also get... {3,5,7,8}? –  Nick Boutelier Apr 11 '13 at 17:42
    
Because it's a greater than, it's independent of 1, 2, and 3, right? If all your constraints are going to be inequalities, I think I would get rid of clause and have columns col_name, op, and value (just the number). When you need to, in later queries, you can reconstruct the clause by concatenating these fields together. Now instead of sorting just on col_name, use the concatenation col_name||op as the x in the subquery. Is this clear? –  Andrew Lazarus Apr 11 '13 at 17:57
    
Cool, i've done that so far. I have your previous recursive query working now on the col_name, op, and value fields by concatenating the col_name||op fields. Now I just need to figure out how to ensure im not including the superflous ranges. Ie: WHERE x > 2 AND x > 1. Is that going to take a lot of case statements? –  Nick Boutelier Apr 11 '13 at 19:15
    
@NickBoutelier Your SQL optimizer will almost certainly do that for you. ORMs generate redundant clauses in automatic SQL generation all the time. You can extend the ordering to the value column. I'll leave that as an exercise, but it won't handle x < 2 AND x > 3 with its mixed operators. But unless you have an aesthetic reason, I wouldn't bother, not even to handle cases that evaluate to FALSE like the one I just gave. –  Andrew Lazarus Apr 11 '13 at 19:32
SELECT string_to_array(TRIM(x || ',' || y || ',' || z, ','), ',')
FROM (
WITH sq AS (
    SELECT a.id x, b.id y, c.id z
    FROM where_clauses a, where_clauses b, where_clauses c
    WHERE a.col_name != b.col_name AND
          a.col_name != c.col_name AND
          b.col_name != c.col_name AND
          a.id < b.id AND
          b.id < c.id
)
SELECT x, y, z FROM sq
UNION ALL
SELECT distinct x, y, null::int FROM sq
UNION ALL
SELECT distinct y, z, null::int FROM sq
UNION ALL
SELECT distinct x, null::int, null::int FROM sq
UNION ALL
SELECT distinct y, null::int, null::int FROM sq
UNION ALL
SELECT distinct z, null::int, null::int FROM sq
) ORDER BY 1;

Does above query helps you out ?

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What would this look like with columns named a-z instead of just x-z? –  Andrew Lazarus Apr 11 '13 at 8:16

Try this code, it selects three columns, those that are not used for a clause are left NULL, you could concatenate or manipulate that result further:

--all possibilities with only one clause
SELECT
    id AS ID1, NULL ID2, NULL AS ID3
  FROM where_clauses
--all possibilities with two clauses (xy,xz,yz)
UNION
SELECT
    WC1.id AS ID1, WC2.id AS ID2, NULL AS ID3
  FROM where_clauses WC1
  CROSS JOIN where_clauses WC2
  WHERE
    WC1.col_name != WC2.col_name
    AND WC1.id > WC2.id
--all possibilities with an x and a y and a z clause
UNION
SELECT
    WC1.id AS ID1, WC2.id AS ID2, WC3.id AS ID3
  FROM where_clauses WC1
  CROSS JOIN where_clauses WC2
  CROSS JOIN where_clauses WC3
  WHERE
    WC1.col_name != WC2.col_name
    AND WC1.id > WC2.id

    AND WC1.col_name != WC3.col_name
    AND WC1.id > WC3.id

    AND WC2.col_name != WC3.col_name
    AND WC2.id > WC3.id

Here is a fiddle.

EDIT: modified fiddle slightly

share|improve this answer
    
What would this look like with columns named a-z instead of just x-z? –  Andrew Lazarus Apr 11 '13 at 8:15
    
pretty long I guess ;) –  DrCopyPaste Apr 11 '13 at 8:23

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