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I believe that in addition, the left-hand and right-hand sides can be swapped interchangeably, correct? This rule doesn't seem to work with multimodular logic.

The basic concept:
    [1,2,3] + [4,5,6] = [5,7,9]

Adding different lengths:
    [1,2,3] + [4,5] = [5,7,7] or [[5,7],7]
    [1,2] + [3,4,5] = [9,6] or [10,6] or [4,6,6] or [[4,6],6]
    Above you can see different outputs, depending on how you view the logic. When the smaller array goes past its max index, it reverts back to the start. I would also assume that the length of the LHS has precedence in this case. But it could also either adhere to the larger length, or even add another module.

Multimodular & singular combined:
    [1,2,3] + 1 = [2,3,4]
    1 + [1,2,3] = 7 or 9 or [2,3,4]
    Again, you can see how there are different ways of looking at this, now that the other ideas have been presented.

I couldn't find any established documentation on this type of logic so any assistance would be wonderful. I've added the current script at the bottom, which currently gives precedence to the LHS. I've easily switched between the precedence of LHS, and length, and I'm just not sure which way is the right way to go.

As requested, I've added the logic behind the examples below. The main rule that each example follows, is that the smaller array will always loop back to the beginning.

Adding groups with the same lengths has already been established:
[a,b,c] + [1,2,3] = [a+1, b+2, c+3]

Here are the possible calculations for varying lengths:
[a,b,c] + [1,2] = [a+2, b+2, c+1] or [[1+a, 1+c], 2+b]
[a,b] + [1,2,3] = [a+1+3, b+2] or [(a+1) + (a+3), b+2] or [a+1, b+2, a+3] or [[a+1, a+3], b+2]
[a,b,c] + 1 = [a+1, b+1, c+1]
1 + [a,b,c] = (1+a+b+c) or (1+a) + (1+b) + (1+c) or [1+a, 1+b, 1+c]

JavaScript:

var MMMath = Math;

// Multimodal add
MMMath.add = function () {
    switch (arguments.length) {
        case 0:
            return NaN;
        case 1:
            return arguments[0];
        default:
            var values = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
            var arg1 = values[0];
            var arg2 = values[1];
            var length = arg1.length < arg2.length || arg1.length === undefined ? arg2.length : arg1.length;
            if (length === undefined) {
                length = 0;
                var sum = arg1 + arg2;
                if (values.length > 2) {
                    values = [sum].concat(values.slice(2, values.length));
                    return MMMath.add.apply(null, values);
                } else {
                    return sum;
                }
            } else {
                var lhsIsMulti = arg1.length !== undefined;
                var rhsIsMulti = arg2.length !== undefined;
                for (var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
                    var lhsPos = i;
                    var rhsPos = i;

                    // if max length goes beyond one array/object's boundaries, revert back to the start
                    if (arg1.length - 1 < lhsPos) {
                        lhsPos -= arg1.length;
                    }
                    if (arg2.length - 1 < rhsPos) {
                        rhsPos -= arg2.length;
                    }
                    if (lhsIsMulti) {
                        if (rhsIsMulti) { // a + 1
                            arg1[lhsPos] = MMMath.add(arg1[lhsPos], arg2[rhsPos]);
                        } else { // a + [1, 2]
                            arg1[lhsPos] = MMMath.add(arg1[lhsPos], arg2);
                        }
                    } else {
                        if (rhsIsMulti) { // [a, b] + 1
                            arg1 = MMMath.add(arg1, arg2[rhsPos]);
                        } else { // [a, b] + [1, 2]
                            arg1 = MMMath.add(arg1, arg2);
                        }
                    }
                }
                if (values.length > 2) {
                    values = [arg1].concat(values.slice(2, values.length));
                    return MMMath.add.apply(null, values);
                } else {
                    return arg1;
                }
            }
    }
};
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from where are you getting the answers? –  J.Miller Apr 11 '13 at 5:54
    
What's the arithmetic for? It seems that the purpose of the code will to a large extent drive the implementation. –  Simon MᶜKenzie Apr 11 '13 at 5:57
    
I've added how I calculated the answers. The purpose? I'm creating a custom JavaScript Math object which supports multimodular arguments. The purpose of that? Fun. :) –  Joey Schooley Apr 11 '13 at 6:12
    
I was hesitant to add my script because it needs a lot of cleaning. But I guess that's what this place is for! Hope you get a kick out of it. Ex. MMMath.add([1, [2, 3]], [3, 4], [5, 6]) = [9, [12, 13]] –  Joey Schooley Apr 11 '13 at 6:59
1  
Be careful: your custom add method will also be available in the Math object, since MMMath is only a reference. –  sp00m Apr 11 '13 at 7:31
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Still contains redundancies, but here is the script I came up with which supports arrays.

MMMath.add = function () {
    switch (arguments.length) {
        case 0:
            return NaN;
        case 1:
            return arguments[0];
        default:
            var values = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
            var arg1 = values[0];
            var arg2 = values[1];
            var lhsIsSingular = arg1.length === undefined;
            var rhsIsSingular = arg2.length === undefined;
            var length = arg1.length < arg2.length || lhsIsSingular ? arg2.length : arg1.length;
            if (length === undefined) { // lhs is singular & rhs is singular
                var sum = arg1 + arg2;
                if (values.length > 2) {
                    values = [sum].concat(values.slice(2, values.length));
                    return MMMath.add.apply(null, values);
                } else {
                    return sum;
                }
            } else {
                var lhs = [arg1];
                var rhs = [arg2];
                if (!lhsIsSingular) {
                    lhs = arg1;
                    arg1 = 0;
                }
                if (!rhsIsSingular) {
                    rhs = arg2;
                    arg2 = 0;
                }
                for (var i = lhs.length; i < length; i++) {
                    lhs.push(arg1);
                }
                for (var i = rhs.length; i < length; i++) {
                    rhs.push(arg2);
                }
                for (var i = 0; i < length; i++) {
                    lhs[i] = MMMath.add(lhs[i], rhs[i]);

                }
                if (values.length > 2) {
                    values = [lhs].concat(values.slice(2, values.length));
                    return MMMath.add.apply(null, values);
                } else {
                    return lhs;
                }
            }
    }
};
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