Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I observed the following behavior.

Took two property variables.

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *stringOne;
@property (nonatomic, assign) NSString *stringTwo;

In .m file written below code..

 NSMutableString *localstring= [[NSMutableString alloc] initWithString:@"test"];
 self.stringOne = localstring;
 NSLog(@"localstring = %d", [string retainCount]);
 NSLog(@"string one retain count = %d", [self.stringOne retainCount]);
 self.stringTwo = localstring;
 NSLog(@"localstring = %d", [localstring retainCount]);
 NSLog(@"string two  retain count = %d", [self.stringTwo retainCount]);

Here localstring retain count is 1 because of alloc. Now i gave self.stringOne = localString.

The retain count of localstring will become two because of retain property of stringOne. Now i gave self.stringTwo = localString.

Even here the localstring retain count is incremented by one. Notice that i have given assign property to stringTwo. Practically the retain count of localstring or stringTwo should not increase by 1 as it is assign property. Please correct me if i am wrong.

Thanks Jithen

share|improve this question
1  
When you use a retain property's setter, that object's retain count should be increased. You seem to be surprised that the retain count for localstring also increases, but you shouldn't. They point to the same object. As a result, it's impossible for them to have different retainCount values. –  Rob Apr 11 '13 at 6:41
    
BTW, you're looking at [string retainCount], but string is not a variable you reference anywhere in this question. Also, when I use the assign version of stringTwo, my retain count does not increase (which is why I'm wondering if your first NSLog statement is looking at the right variable). –  Rob Apr 11 '13 at 6:57
add comment

5 Answers

Dump the retainCount; it is useless. http://www.whentouseretaincount.com/

The source of your confusion is in not understanding how pointers work. Modify your code like this:

@interface BBQ:NSObject
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *stringOne;
@property (nonatomic, assign) NSString *stringTwo;
@end

@implementation BBQ
- (void) burn
{
    NSMutableString *localstring= [[NSMutableString alloc] initWithString:@"test"];
    self.stringOne = localstring;
    NSLog(@"localstring = %p", localstring);
    NSLog(@"string one = %p", self.stringOne);
    self.stringTwo = localstring;
    NSLog(@"localstring = %p", localstring);
    NSLog(@"string two  = %p", self.stringTwo);
}
@end

It'll spew something like this:

2013-04-11 08:48:13.770 asdffadsfasddfsa[18096:303] localstring = 0x10010aaf0
2013-04-11 08:48:13.772 asdffadsfasddfsa[18096:303] string one = 0x10010aaf0
2013-04-11 08:48:13.772 asdffadsfasddfsa[18096:303] localstring = 0x10010aaf0
2013-04-11 08:48:13.772 asdffadsfasddfsa[18096:303] string two  = 0x10010aaf0

There is only one string instance in play; localstring, stringOne, and stringTwo all hold references to exactly one instance of NSMUtableString.

Thus, you'll see +1 RC of that one string instance for the alloc, +1 for the assignment to the stringOne property and no change for stringTwo.

(RC's should only be reasoned about in terms of deltas; if you retain an object, you need to balance that with a release when you no longer need the object. That the object may be retained by something else is irrelevant.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

When you declare a property with retain, it automatically 'retains' the object, thus increasing its retain count.

So NSMutableString *localstring= [[NSMutableString alloc] initWithString:@"test"]; makes retain count = 1;

Then self.stringOne = localstring; makes retain count = 2.

My thinking is if the property is given retain, then after this line self.stringOne = localstring , the retain count of self.stringone should become one

When you create an object, it will start with a retain count of 1.

share|improve this answer
    
that's not true –  Andrey Chernukha Apr 11 '13 at 6:38
2  
Why not? It seems true to me –  borrrden Apr 11 '13 at 6:39
    
yep, sorry, you're right, that's true –  Andrey Chernukha Apr 11 '13 at 6:39
add comment

When I ran this code:

@interface ViewController ()

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *stringOne;
@property (nonatomic, assign) NSString *stringTwo;

@end

@implementation ViewController

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    [self test];
}

- (void)test
{
    NSMutableString *localstring = [[NSMutableString alloc] initWithString:@"test"];
    NSLog(@"localstring (before setting `stringOne` or `stringTwo`) = %d", [localstring retainCount]);
    self.stringOne = localstring;
    NSLog(@"localstring (after setting `stringOne`) = %d", [localstring retainCount]);
    NSLog(@"string one retain count = %d", [self.stringOne retainCount]);
    self.stringTwo = localstring;
    NSLog(@"localstring (after setting `stringTwo`) = %d", [localstring retainCount]);
    NSLog(@"string two retain count = %d", [self.stringTwo retainCount]);
}

@end

I received this console log:

localstring (before setting `stringOne` or `stringTwo`) = 1
localstring (after setting `stringOne`) = 2
string one retain count = 2
localstring (after setting `stringTwo`) = 2
string two retain count = 2

And all of those values are precisely as one would expect.

  • When you first create the object referenced by the local variable, that object has a +1 retain count.

  • When you set the retain property, stringOne, the object's retain count will be incremented to +2, and as both localstring and stringOne reference that same object, they'll both report the same retainCount.

  • But when you use the assign property, stringTwo, though, the retainCount does not change.

share|improve this answer
add comment

First of all, never use retainCount for anything. It is simply not reliable since it is a global retain count, and can be influenced by other factors outside of your code. Amazingly, in this case, it is correct though. Let's examine:

//Immediately localstring is +1 because you allocated it
NSMutableString *localstring= [[NSMutableString alloc] initWithString:@"test"];

//self.stringOne is a retain property, so localstring is incremented again (+2)
self.stringOne = localstring;

//self.stringTwo is a retain property, so localstring is incremented again (+3)
self.stringTwo = localstring;


Note that now localstring, self.stringOne and self.stringTwo all point to the same location in memory. You are not copying the memory contents every time you use the = sign (your way of thinking seems to indicate that you think that is how it works). You are simply pointing another variable at a location in memory and saying "Don't deallocate this piece of memory until I say so." (at least in the case of retain properties).

Conclusion: localstring's retain count, self.stringOne's retain count, and self.stringTwo's retain count are all the same.

Sidenote: It is impossible for an object to have a retain count of zero. The only time that can happen is when retainCount is sent to nil (which I assume self.stringOne is when you test it)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation. One thing here i forgot to mention is even if i make property as assign, the retain count is increased. self.stringOne is assign property (By mistake i have entered retain), if i do self.stringOne = localstring, even then the localstring retain count is increased by 1. Whereas on assignment it shouldnt. –  jithen Apr 11 '13 at 6:50
1  
Your edited code shows the second string as assign, but your comment says the first string. Even the fact that you forgot this incredibly important piece of information makes me doubt what you say. Assign will not increase the retain count of an object. If the retain count is increased for some reason, it is happening somewhere else. –  borrrden Apr 11 '13 at 7:12
add comment

While it is never a good idea to look at retainCount when writing code, it is behaving as it should in this case. I think your understanding of memory management seems to be a little bit off.

To answer your question,

NSMutableString *localstring= [[NSMutableString alloc] initWithString:@"test"];

This creates a mutable string Object,increments its retain count and returns a pointer to it. Note that retainCount is associated with the Object and not the pointer.

When you assign it to your retain property,

self.stringOne = localstring;

it passes retain to your Object and increments its retain count by 1 again. Now your object's retain count is 2 and both the pointers point to the same object. So, when you log retainCount, you get what you get. Hope this answers your question.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation. I am changing my question. One thing here i forgot to mention is even if i make property as assign, the retain count is increased. self.stringOne is assign property (By mistake i have entered retain), if i do self.stringOne = localstring, even then the localstring retain count is increased by 1. Whereas on assignment it shouldnt. –  jithen Apr 11 '13 at 6:51
    
@jithen You made stringTwo an assign property, not stringOne. It should increase when you use the stringOne retain setter, but not when you use the stringTwo assign setter. –  Rob Apr 11 '13 at 7:03
    
@jithen As Rob said, assign will not increase retain count. You seem to be logging incorrectly -> '[string retainCount]' –  MadhavanRP Apr 11 '13 at 9:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.