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I'm working through a linked list example. However, I currently cannot understand the head_insert method. Please would someone explain it a little further. Thank you.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct node_ll
{
    int payload;
    node_ll* next;  // pointer to the next node
};

void head_insert(node_ll** list, int pload)
{
    node_ll* temp = new node_ll;//Declare temp, a pointer to a node.
    temp->payload = pload;//Set the payload of the struct at the address of temp to pload.
    temp->next = *list;//Set the next of the struct at the address of temp to the pointer to the old head of the list.
    *list = temp;//Set the pointer to the old head of the list to the pointer to the temp node.
    //Why doesnt the temp->next = temp?
};

void print_ll(node_ll** list)
{
    node_ll* temp;
    temp = *list;
    while (temp) // != NULL
    {
        cout << temp->payload << '\n';
        temp = temp->next;
    };
}

int main()
{
    node_ll* alist = NULL;  
    cout << "Empty list a to start\n";
    head_insert(&alist, 2); 
    head_insert(&alist, 4);
    head_insert(&alist, 6);
    cout << "List a after head insertion of 2,4,6 is \n";
    print_ll(&alist);
    cout << '\n';
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

My confusion is detailed in the comments. If I have the lines

temp->next = *list;
*list = temp;

why doesn't my newly created node point to its own address in next?

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I don't really understand your question. There is no "the list" as a single entity that can "point to" anything; "the list" consists of all the nodes. –  Karl Knechtel Apr 11 '13 at 6:45
    
@KarlKnechtel I have corrected my error. Sorry. –  Danny Rancher Apr 11 '13 at 6:48
    
Hint: What was *list pointing to before the *list = temp assignment? –  WhozCraig Apr 11 '13 at 7:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
//Declare temp, a pointer to a node.

No. "Create a new node, and let temp be the address of that node."

//Set the payload of the struct at the address of temp to pload.

No. "Set the payload of the struct whose address is temp to pload". That's probably what you meant, but you really need to be precise about these things. Anyway, this is filling in the payload of the new node that we just created.

//Set the next of the struct at the address of temp to the pointer to the old head of the list.

Similarly... "Set the next of the struct whose address is temp to the address of the old head of the list."

//Set the pointer to the old head of the list to the pointer to the temp node.

Careful. Here's the thing: "the address of the old head of the list" is a value, not a variable. It can exist at multiple places in memory, in the same way that the number 4 can be stored at multiple places in memory.

The function was given a node_ll**, i.e. a (node_ll*)* - a pointer to a node_ll*. Specifically, when we called the function from main, we gave it a pointer to the variable a_list in the current call to main.

Thus, when we do *list =, we are writing to that memory location - in effect, replacing the a_list variable. Playing with memory addresses like this allows us to simulate "pass by reference" and change the value of variables that come from the caller (we can't just access these from the parameters, because we were given a copy; and we can't access them as globals because they aren't globals).

//Why doesnt the temp->next = temp?

Why would it? Code runs from top to bottom (control structures notwithstanding). temp->next was set to the old head of the list, before we set the new head of the list.

It seems like you expected temp->next to change simply because, at that point in the process, it happened to point to the old head of the list, and then we changed a variable that also happened to have the same value - i.e., to point to the old head of the list. But they are quite clearly separate variables. If I write a = 4; a *= 3, the value 4 does not change; the variable a does. So it is with pointers, as well; they're just another kind of value.

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This is confusing code.

list is a pointer to a pointer to a node. *list = temp is not changing any nodes, it's changing the pointer that was passed in, so it points to the inserted node.

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list is a pointer to a pointer to a node. Is this correct? I thought **list was a pointer to a pointer to a node. –  Danny Rancher Apr 11 '13 at 6:55
    
Our declaration for the parameter is node_ll** list. That means "the type of list is node_ll**". Well, that's the C++ way of thinking about it. The traditional C way of thinking about it is "the type of **list is node_ll". But these really mean the same thing. It's an artifact of the "clever" idea Kernighan and Ritchie had, to use the same symbol to represent the dereferencing operation as is used to describe the type in the first place. –  Karl Knechtel Apr 11 '13 at 7:02
    
It's not really that confusing; the extra level of indirection is the standard way to simulate pass by reference. The problem is that C has so few tools for abstraction that pointers get used for multiple purposes, and sometimes you build up quite a few *'s used for different purposes and without a clear way to indicate the purpose of each. –  Karl Knechtel Apr 11 '13 at 7:04

In your head_insert function new Node is added to the beginning. ie new new node will be the head of your linked list

temp->next = *list;//Store pointer to earlier head as the next node
*list = temp;  // Make pointer new node as the head node

In your Code a double pointer is passed as argument into the function. ie if A is your pointer header node then an address B which contains A is passed as argument into your function.

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