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For example, I have a matrix:

> a = cbind(sample(c(0,1),6,replace=T), sample(c(0,1),6,replace=T))
> a
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    0    0
[2,]    0    0
[3,]    0    1
[4,]    1    0
[5,]    1    0
[6,]    1    1

I want to make a object b out of a so that b is a factor, with each level represent a different row in a. In this case, b would be:

> b
[1] 1 1 2 3 3 4
Levels: 1 2 3 4

I can do it in a dirty way, but I am wondering if there is an elegant solution?

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How big is dataset? will a always have 2 columns? will a always contain only integer, only numeric or only characters? –  Chinmay Patil Apr 11 '13 at 7:22
    
What is the "dirty" way that you currently use? How do we ensure that our way isn't also dirty? –  Ananda Mahto Apr 11 '13 at 7:23
    
the dirty way what I thought is to use the paste to concatenate each row. But I forgot I also could use apply function to vectorize it. –  RNA Apr 11 '13 at 15:19
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A possible solution :

 b <- apply(a, 1, paste, collapse="_")
 b <- factor(b, levels=unique(b), labels=1:length(unique(b)))
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This was my original idea, and I think paste would be faster than interaction, but not sure what the OP has already tried. –  Ananda Mahto Apr 11 '13 at 7:52
    
@AnandaMahto I would say that as always it depends of the volume of data. When this one grows then paste is faster than interaction. –  droopy Apr 11 '13 at 8:34
1  
it's not just the volume of data. As the number of interactions increase, since paste is vectorized, it will definitely be faster. Adding drop = FALSE speeds up interaction a bit, but I'm not sure by how much. –  Ananda Mahto Apr 11 '13 at 8:40
    
This is a good solution. Thanks. –  RNA Apr 11 '13 at 15:17
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Not knowing what your current "dirty" way is, here is a possible solution:

> aFac <- interaction(data.frame(a), lex.order=TRUE)
> factor(aFac, levels = levels(aFac), labels = seq_along(levels(aFac)))
[1] 1 1 2 3 3 4
Levels: 1 2 3 4

Where:

a <- structure(c(0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 1L), 
               .Dim = c(6L, 2L), .Dimnames = list(NULL, NULL))

The only reason I've used lex.order = TRUE is to match your specific output.


Another possibility is:

> aFac <- interaction(data.frame(a), lex.order=TRUE, drop = TRUE)
> factor(as.numeric(aFac))
[1] 1 1 2 3 3 4
Levels: 1 2 3 4

The drop = TRUE is to drop any unused levels from interaction, as we would get with the example in the comments below.

To demonstrate the influence of drop = TRUE, consider the following, paying attention to the resulting factor levels:

> b <- structure(c(1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1), .Dim = c(6L,2L))
> bFac1 <- interaction(data.frame(b), lex.order=TRUE)
> bFac2 <- interaction(data.frame(b), lex.order=TRUE, drop=TRUE)
> factor(as.numeric(bFac1))
[1] 3 4 3 2 2 4
Levels: 2 3 4
> factor(as.numeric(bFac2))
[1] 2 3 2 1 1 3
Levels: 1 2 3
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+1, didn't know about interaction –  Chinmay Patil Apr 11 '13 at 7:29
1  
@DidzisElferts, updated. Works if levels are specified too. –  Ananda Mahto Apr 11 '13 at 7:48
    
+1 for interaction() –  RNA Apr 11 '13 at 15:22
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Depending on simplicity of data, following can be one way to do it..

a
##      V1 V2
## [1,]  0  0
## [2,]  0  0
## [3,]  0  1
## [4,]  1  0
## [5,]  1  0
## [6,]  1  1

hash <- apply(a, 1, paste, collapse = "/")
b <- factor(hash, labels = 1:length(unique(hash)))
b
## [1] 1 1 2 3 3 4
## Levels: 1 2 3 4
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since your answer came later than droopy's, I accepted droopy's answer. but thanks! +1 –  RNA Apr 11 '13 at 15:20
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