Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a basic Interface which another class is implementing.

package info;

import org.springframework.stereotype.Service;

public interface Student 
{
    public String getStudentID();
}

`

package info;

import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Service;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;

@Service
public class StudentImpl implements Student
{
    @Override
    public String getStudentID() 
    {
        return "Unimplemented";
    }
}

I then have a service to inject that class into

package info;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Service;

@Service
public class InfoService {

    @Autowired
    Student student;

    public String runProg()
    {
            return student.getStudentID();
    }
}

What I want to know is, how do I set up a JUnit test so that a Mock class of the Student interface steps in with a stubbed method instead of the method in StudentImpl. The injection does work but I want to use amock class to simulate the results instead for the sake of testing. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In my opinion, autowiring in unit tests is a sign that's it's an integration test rather than unit test, so I prefer to do my own "wiring", as you describe. It might require you to do some refactoring of your code, but it shouldn't be a problem. In your case, I would add a constructor to InfoService that get's a Student implementation. If you wish, you can also make this constructor @Autowired, and remove the @Autowired from the student field. Spring would then still be able to autowire it, and it's also more testable.

@Service
public class InfoService {
    Student student;

    @Autowired
    public InfoService(Student student) {
        this.student = student;
    }

}

Then it will be trivial to pass mocks between your services in your tests:

@Test
public void myTest() {
    Student mockStudent = mock(Student.class);
    InfoService service = new InfoService(mockStudent);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is there anything special you have to place in the JUnit in order for this to work? The intention is to use when(fakeStudent.getStudentId()).thenReturn("Some Value"); –  James Redmond Apr 11 '13 at 8:05
    
No, in your test you would just create your mocks and then "wire" it up yourself. I added a simple example to the answer. –  NilsH Apr 11 '13 at 8:06
    
Still doesn't seem to be working. I'm still getting the String from StudentImpl. –  James Redmond Apr 11 '13 at 8:14
    
You might have to run the test without the standard JUnit runner. Not the one supplied by Spring. It will disable autowiring in your test. –  NilsH Apr 11 '13 at 8:21
    
It actually does work. I had been assigning an ApplicationContext and BeanFactory anytime I have Initialised the InfoService. Once I removed those from the test it started working. –  James Redmond Apr 11 '13 at 8:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.